Discussion:
Live Exports
(too old to reply)
Pat Gardiner
2006-07-18 08:07:28 UTC
Permalink
Good article by Jim in FG this week.
Yes I enjoyed that one too!
whether RPA did is another matter ;-))
Oh come on -- any chance of letting the rest of us into the secrets
:~)
http://www.farmersguardian.com/story.asp?sectioncode=44&storycode=3402
Actually it is a good article.

If you study Jim's activities over the last six years you will see a steady
improvement. He has virtually ceased hurling mindless abuse at politicians,
suspended his wilder rabble rousing and ceased manufacturing libels - and we
never hear anything of Vance these days. His prose seems to be rather more
comprehensible too.

Perhaps it is the dignity of being the President of the Cumbria of the
Country Land and Business Association, perhaps it my observations on his
activities, who knows?

Now, I'm sure you will all have noticed the parallels between this article
and my complaints about irregularities in the testing for Brucella
melitensis in sheep.
http://pages.britishlibrary.net/patgardiner/mediarelease.htm

Actually, it all comes down to much the same thing. If we can persuade Jim
to write about all irregular and illegal activities by Defra and associates,
whether they impact on industrial scale farming or not, wouldn't that be an
achievement to be proud of?

It seems a shame to leave it to animal rights, merely because they can
hardly have failed to miss that they can stop live exports legally without
throwing themselves under lorries.
--
Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com
--
Stephen Temple
J F Temple & Son Ltd
Mrs Temple's Cheese - Quality Norfolk Produce
Barn Owl Instruments and Controls
Ice
2006-07-18 08:25:19 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 09:07:28 +0100, "Pat Gardiner"
Post by Pat Gardiner
Good article by Jim in FG this week.
Yes I enjoyed that one too!
whether RPA did is another matter ;-))
Oh come on -- any chance of letting the rest of us into the secrets
:~)
http://www.farmersguardian.com/story.asp?sectioncode=44&storycode=3402
Actually it is a good article.
Ouch. Checkout the gruesome picture. No wonder he has a grudge against
life, who wouldn't with a boat like that? Certainly wouldn't want that
living near your local school.
Post by Pat Gardiner
If you study Jim's activities over the last six years you will see a steady
improvement. He has virtually ceased hurling mindless abuse at politicians,
suspended his wilder rabble rousing and ceased manufacturing libels - and we
never hear anything of Vance these days. His prose seems to be rather more
comprehensible too.
Perhaps it is the dignity of being the President of the Cumbria of the
Country Land and Business Association, perhaps it my observations on his
activities, who knows?
Now, I'm sure you will all have noticed the parallels between this article
and my complaints about irregularities in the testing for Brucella
melitensis in sheep.
http://pages.britishlibrary.net/patgardiner/mediarelease.htm
Actually, it all comes down to much the same thing. If we can persuade Jim
to write about all irregular and illegal activities by Defra and associates,
whether they impact on industrial scale farming or not, wouldn't that be an
achievement to be proud of?
It seems a shame to leave it to animal rights, merely because they can
hardly have failed to miss that they can stop live exports legally without
throwing themselves under lorries.
"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 08:46:38 UTC
Permalink
)
What interests me is why so many farmers are prepared to sell cheap to
big companies who then do all the marketing and adding value for them.
--
Ian Alexander
A lot of this is historical. Initially farmers used to have to market their
own produce. Then it was nationalised, We got the Milk Marketing Board, the
Egg Marketing Board, the Wool Marketing Board, the Potato marketing board,
the list goes on. As these statutory bodies were scaled down they changed.
However I can remember a weights and measures inspector checking our bulk
milk tank. He was checking it not to stop me robbing the MMB but to make
sure the MMB wasn't robbing me. In his eyes I didn't sell milk to the MMB,
it was requisitioned by a statutory body who paid me compensation for it.
All this changed and there was an attempt by farmers to keep the
MMB as a co-op to give them marketing strength, an attempt which was
forcibly broken up by the government.
Now it is difficult to get into marketing. As an example I was in
our local auction and wandered downt the pig end. They were selling killing
pigs and they were so cheap that I bought three, paid to have them
slaughtered,,jointed and sold them at £35 per half pig to people with
freezers. I shudder to think how many regulations I broke collecting them
from the butcher and delivering them in my car. I do rear a few weaners at a
time and fatten them and sell them in joints for freezers, I even cure the
flitch as bacon for them if they don't like belly pork. (£40 per half a
pig, extra for the curing, how about that for being spammed, email your
orders here :-)) )
I get away with it because its small scale and I don't advertise so I don't
get bothered by officialdom.
Unfortunately each time you get a new hygiene regulation or piece
of health and safety legislation you make it harder and harder for the small
man to get started. It's the same across the board. We have a government who
is pushing forward regulations which mean that small slaughterhouses are no
longer viable and are closing while at the same time they want us to
slaughter sheep in the UK and send them abroad as carcasses. Ignore morality
for a moment, try and explain to me the logic.
A final problem is that what we once sold as consumer goods are now
commodities. In my own case, milk. I've drunk unpasturised all my life. My
stepdaughter who now lives in town cannot face bottled milk as it tastes
disgusting. (All of it, not just one dairy) yet what my father carried round
and sold out of a bucket in jug fulls I would have to invest in a costly
pasturising plant to sell. Not to mention bottles/cartons etc. More
regulation, less competition for the big boys.
Its the same with a lot of things, vegatables used to be sold by
farmers but now everyone wants them clean, chilled, packed etc. Seen the
cost of setting up that sort of operation?
Not only that but the sheer difficulty of getting to people to sell
them things is a problem. Planning regs and the demand for housing, plus the
impossibility of actually farming within walking distance of some urban
areas means that a lot of farmers are now geographically separated from
their potential customers to a considerable extent.
There was also comment about customers not just wanting cheap food.
I will grant you that they want convienience but in this area at least,
economy is still king. In a Barrow in Furness supermarket Organic food takes
up very little shelf space. If it manages to fill the end rack opposite a
check out that is about it. I suspect regional/social factors play heavily
here. I would not expect to be able to grow and sell a farms worth of
organic produce at a premium locally.
Jim Webster
"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 08:51:55 UTC
Permalink
)
What interests me is why so many farmers are prepared to sell cheap to
big companies who then do all the marketing and adding value for them.
--
Ian Alexander
A lot of this is historical. Initially farmers used to have to market their
own produce. Then it was nationalised, We got the Milk Marketing Board, the
Egg Marketing Board, the Wool Marketing Board, the Potato marketing board,
the list goes on. As these statutory bodies were scaled down they changed.
However I can remember a weights and measures inspector checking our bulk
milk tank. He was checking it not to stop me robbing the MMB but to make
sure the MMB wasn't robbing me. In his eyes I didn't sell milk to the MMB,
it was requisitioned by a statutory body who paid me compensation for it.
All this changed and there was an attempt by farmers to keep the
MMB as a co-op to give them marketing strength, an attempt which was
forcibly broken up by the government.
Now it is difficult to get into marketing. As an example I was in
our local auction and wandered downt the pig end. They were selling killing
pigs and they were so cheap that I bought three, paid to have them
slaughtered,,jointed and sold them at £35 per half pig to people with
freezers. I shudder to think how many regulations I broke collecting them
from the butcher and delivering them in my car. I do rear a few weaners at a
time and fatten them and sell them in joints for freezers, I even cure the
flitch as bacon for them if they don't like belly pork. (£40 per half a
pig, extra for the curing, how about that for being spammed, email your
orders here :-)) )
I get away with it because its small scale and I don't advertise so I don't
get bothered by officialdom.
Unfortunately each time you get a new hygiene regulation or piece
of health and safety legislation you make it harder and harder for the small
man to get started. It's the same across the board. We have a government who
is pushing forward regulations which mean that small slaughterhouses are no
longer viable and are closing while at the same time they want us to
slaughter sheep in the UK and send them abroad as carcasses. Ignore morality
for a moment, try and explain to me the logic.
A final problem is that what we once sold as consumer goods are now
commodities. In my own case, milk. I've drunk unpasturised all my life. My
stepdaughter who now lives in town cannot face bottled milk as it tastes
disgusting. (All of it, not just one dairy) yet what my father carried round
and sold out of a bucket in jug fulls I would have to invest in a costly
pasturising plant to sell. Not to mention bottles/cartons etc. More
regulation, less competition for the big boys.
Its the same with a lot of things, vegatables used to be sold by
farmers but now everyone wants them clean, chilled, packed etc. Seen the
cost of setting up that sort of operation?
Not only that but the sheer difficulty of getting to people to sell
them things is a problem. Planning regs and the demand for housing, plus the
impossibility of actually farming within walking distance of some urban
areas means that a lot of farmers are now geographically separated from
their potential customers to a considerable extent.
There was also comment about customers not just wanting cheap food.
I will grant you that they want convienience but in this area at least,
economy is still king. In a Barrow in Furness supermarket Organic food takes
up very little shelf space. If it manages to fill the end rack opposite a
check out that is about it. I suspect regional/social factors play heavily
here. I would not expect to be able to grow and sell a farms worth of
organic produce at a premium locally.
Jim Webster
Sometimes confession is not good for the soul, and can have all sorts
of consequences.




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 09:11:36 UTC
Permalink
WE REPORTED FOOT AND MOUTH FARM TWO MONTHS BEFORE DISEASE WAS DETECTED
. . .

Burnside Farm at Heddon-on-the Wall was the subject of a Hillside
investigation just two months before the first British case of F&M was
detected there. We had received information that there were rotting
carcasses amongst live pigs, piglets being eaten alive by other pigs,
and sickly-looking pigs indicating the possibility of a disease being
present. The Waugh brothers, who ran the farm, had previously been
evicted from a pig farm by a local council where pictorial evidence
also revealed pigs living in absolute squalor. On arrival at Burnside
we could see what we now know may have been the contaminated swill
which was being fed to the pigs. We reported our concerns to the
appropriate authorities expecting them to fully investigate. The farm
was inspected 22nd Dec 2000 by Trading Standards and MAFF. At the time
these government officials claimed they could find no prosecutable
offences and simply 'advised' the Waughs to clean up. However, soon
after this farm was confirmed to be the source of the F&M outbreak, Mr
Waugh was convicted of several charges, including causing unnecessary
suffering to animals.

Hillside's investigation team have video evidence to prove that time
and time again all species of farm animals are routinely left to
suffer injury, illness and disease without any care or veterinary
treatment. Can we really be surprised that such a serious disease was
overlooked when finding sick animals in the intensive factory farming
industry is so commonplace?



Hillside was founded by Wendy Valentine who also founded Redwings
Horse Sanctuary in Norfolk. She is very concerned about the way in
which Redwings is now administrated and current policies there which
are very different from the founding ethics. If you would like to see
a copy of a letter from Wendy to Redwings stating her concerns please
click here to request this in comments
http://www.hillside.org.uk/contact.htm


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 09:14:41 UTC
Permalink
http://www.hillside.org.uk/index.htm

Hillside Investigations Report . . .

On Christmas Day 2002 we began investigations into the horrendous
conditions of
ducks being reared on RSPCA ‘monitored’ Freedom Food approved farms.
These
investigations continued until 13th February 2003 when the RSPCA
raided one farm.
This was actually the FOURTH time that we have brought this duck
producer to their
attention. Although we began filming this same suffering three years
previously, it was not
until December 2002 that we discovered that these ducks were actually
being reared
under the Freedom Food flag.
We filmed shed after shed where literally THOUSANDS of ducks existed
in
unimaginable conditions.
The stench of ammonia enveloped hundreds of crippled, blind, injured
and dying birds as
they were left to linger on for days in the hope that they would draw
breath long enough to
make it to the slaughter line for that extra bit of profit.
After viewing our evidence the RSPCA agreed that our film showed
disturbing scenes of
suffering and neglect and immediately agreed to inspect one offending
farm. However,
inspectors are obliged to inform Freedom Food (which is wholly owned
by the RSPCA) of
any complaint made against a FF approved site and, within three hours
of our confirming the
farm’s location, a clean-up operation had been organised - the first
we had witnessed in
five weeks of filming!
Our response to this was to advise the RSPCA that their planned
inspection would be
fruitless and their raid was aborted. However, just one week later we
found that conditions
were as bad as ever! On receiving this new evidence, the RSPCA agreed
to raid again.
Despite another ‘clean up’ attempt that resulted in around 300 ducks
being culled (we
filmed the fresh bodies dumped in skips outside), the RSPCA still
found a number of
suffering and dying ducks, and had to kill a further 100 on site. The
duck producer was
suspended from the Freedom Food scheme and 18 months later, on the
23rd August 2004,
the RSPCA’s prosecution of Kerry Foods Ltd began.
It was mentioned in court that on one day during the week before the
RSPCA inspection
on 13th February 2003, and again the day before the inspection,
hundreds of ill ducks were
culled on site. Little did the judge realise that on both occasions
these massive culls had
taken place the day before Kerrys expected a visit from the RSPCA!
Although, of course, we were extremely disappointed at the outcome of
the trial, we
were not at all surprised. We had predicted that any prosecution the
RSPCA brought against a
farm that they boasted they’d ‘strictly monitored’, would be destined
to fail and, unfortunately,
we were proved to be right.
Despite our previous exposure (some with BBC Watchdog) of Freedom Food
pigs,
chickens and turkeys being farmed in appalling conditions, Freedom
Food continues to
advocate that their scheme is one ‘of the most highly audited schemes
in the country’. If this
is so, please spare a thought for the millions of animals farmed in
less monitored systems!!!


‘FREEDOM FOOD’ DUCKS’ DAY
OF DESPAIR

Hillside Investigations Report . . .

Dear Hillside
Upon watching the video of ducks on a Freedom Food accredited
farmthere appears to be very many serious welfare considerations. Many
of the ducksare deformed – especially leg deformities leading to
lameness, and many can’tseem able to walk at all – using their wings
as crutches which will evidently lead towing damage too. Other leg
lesions and swellings in the limbs are also visible.One duck is seen
dragging a paralysed leg, which seems dislocated andpossibly
fractured. Other plumage and eye lesions are also visible. Many of
theducks also exhibit signs of nervous system problems: poor balance,
can’t rightthemselves from dorsal recumbancy, apparent blindness.As
for the housing there is some loose rope mesh in which one duck isseen
entangled, unable to free itself.Dead bodies are seen everywhere, also
in the water trough: one body is inan advanced stage of decomposition.
The filming was carried out over severalsuccessive evenings and it is
obvious that the dead bodies have not been removed.This poses a
serious health risk (especially the body in the water).
Mr Amir Kashiv BA, BVSc, MRCVS

This report is written by a veterinary surgeon who viewed just some of
the evidence that we presented to the RSPCA:
It was admitted that
these ducks had never
been attended to by a
vet and the farm’s own
records show that on
alternate weekends
the birds were not
checked at all.
When our investigator, along with a reporter from a national
newspaper, posed as an employee and
worked undercover with a hidden camera in Kerry’s slaughter and
processing plant, further malpractices
were revealed. Despite being an offence to transport them, ailing and
dying ducks were being brought
to the factory to be killed for entry into the human food chain, and a
production line was deliberately
slowed down for the benefit of a visiting Tesco representative. It was
then speeded up again after he left!

On 24th August 2004 Kerry Foods were found NOT GUILTY of
causing unnecessary suffering, pain and distress to ducks!
Despite providing the RSPCA with footage taken on several different
days over a period of six weeks, it was
only the evidence gathered on the day of their raid, 13th February
2003, that was used in court. We felt the

RSPCA presented a very weak case and some of their prosecution tactics
were questionable:
1. The vet acting for the RSPCA during the inspection when they found
dozens of dead and dying ducks,
stated that he didn’t carry out post-mortems on the decomposing birds
as some had been dead for up to 24
hours and developing bacteria would confuse the results. In view of
the fact that Kerrys were adamant that
their ‘experienced’ staff carried out thorough inspections, how was it
that decaying birds had been left, in the
vet’s opinion, lying in the sheds for 24 hours, and why wasn’t this
questioned by the prosecution’s barrister?
2. Why was the judge shown the RSPCA’s footage of Kerry’s ducks at
Wood Lane Corner, Little Ellingham
in Norfolk which was filmed AFTER culling had taken place and
therefore bore no resemblence to the scale
of the suffering there beforehand?
3. Despite our investigator being asked by the RSPCA to attend and be
prepared to give evidence, he was not
asked to take the stand at all.
4. Neither the additional footage which we were asked to bring along
or our evidence already in the RSPCA’s
possession was not shown or even referred to.
5. On day one of the two-day hearing the RSPCA issued a press release
which was broadcast by the BBC,
saying that this incident was an isolated one as Kerrys had a good
welfare record. This was in spite of the
copious evidence we had provided them with over the years, so much so
that they eventually felt obliged to
bring about a prosecution.
6. The fact that the farm had an accreditation under the RSPCA’s
Freedom Food scheme was not mentioned
in court and was therefore omitted from all media reports.
It was admitted in court that the birds had been suffering from
septicaemia and the whole case was based
around the fact that Kerrys claimed the duck shed lights are switched
off at 9pm so there wasn’t time to
perform a third routine inspection without disturbing the birds. The
RSPCA and their vet said this check
should have been carried out in order to avoid sick ducks lingering on
for extra unnecessary hours. In court
Mr Richard Charley, for Kerrys, told, under oath, that lights on all
the 30 farms he managed, are turned off at
9pm until 3am the following day to allow the ducks sufficient time to
rest, therefore not allowing time for
a third daily inspection before 9pm. Despite this testimony we have
filmed evidence to show that it
is common practice for the lights to be left on until 11pm, and even
during a recent joint investigation
with the BBC* when we visited Kerry sites on three different
occasions, the sheds were still
illuminated between 10pm and 11pm. Even the RSPCA vet stated in court
that he had written in his notes
(probably from somebody’s information at the time of the raid) that
the lights in the duck sheds went out at
11pm.

We are providing the RSPCA, as the prosecuting body, with this
evidence and await their action.
Despite all their legal wrangling over extra checks and lights-out
times, the fact still remains that if
Kerry’s staff had thoroughly inspected the birds during their normal
twice-daily checks and culled the
ailing birds as they had claimed, we would not have been able to film
the hundreds of ducks left in a
state of prolonged suffering in the evenings just a few hours after
their last ‘inspection’! Our
footage consistently shows dying birds left to suffer for days and we
filmed the farm’s own
records which clearly showed that on alternate weekends the birds were
not checked at
all! Kerry also admitted that they had not consulted their veterinary
practice about the
outbreak of disease which appears to be endemic on their farms.
The ducks referred to in court were the second flock of birds that we
had filmed at the Wood Lane
Corner site between Christmas Day 2002 and 11th February 2003. After
the RSPCA’s raid when postmortems
confirmed that these birds had septicaemia, we followed the lorry
taking those not culled to
Kerry’s slaughterhouse near Diss for entry into the human food chain.
The first flock we filmed displaying
similar worrying symptoms had also been taken for slaughter and
although not thought to pose a health threat
to the public, some consumers must almost certainly be eating birds
that have been harbouring or incubating
septicaemia - commonly known as blood poisoning. Ducks suffering from
septicaemia face a slow death
over a period of up to 48 hours. Septicaemia is often contracted as a
direct result of being kept in stressful,
unnatural conditions. Anyone who has watched our general investigation
video, ‘Factory Farming Today’, will
have seen footage, taken back in 2000, of Kerry Food ducks on another
farm exhibiting similar symptoms to
those we filmed suffering from septicaemia in this 2003 investigation.
District Judge Jennifer Edwards concluded “I think there can be no
doubt that this company did have the
birds’ welfare in their minds.” Maybe if Judge Edwards had been
presented with all the facts she might
have ‘thought’ differently!
If you would like to see just some of the evidence that was withheld
from the court, please request,
free of charge, our video ‘Ducks in Despair’. This video shows our
footage of the Kerry ducks in
question taken on 9th, 10th and 11th February 2003 just days before
the RSPCA raid on the 13th
February.


* To further expose the suffering of factory-farmed animals, we have
been working with the BBC who
have filmed ducks being reared on a different Kerry Food’s site at
Little Ellingham in Norfolk. This was
shown on the investigation programme ‘Inside Out’ in September 2004.
You can see this broadcast
by ordering our FREE video or DVD, Ducks in Depair, from the Gift Shop
page on this web site.
shows the conditions that
ducks in this investigation had
to endure just days before an
RSPCA visit.
Please request your FREE copy from the
Gift Shop on this website
Hillside Investigation Video/DVD
Ducks in Despair
http://www.hillside.org.uk/index.htm


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 09:20:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ice
http://www.hillside.org.uk/index.htm
BBC1's 'Inside Out' (Oct 05) was based on Hillside's video 'Pigs in
Purgatory'. We had filmed this accreditated farm, for 18 months and
despite it being reported 4 times to DEFRA, conditions didn't improve!

C4 'Dispatches' highlights farm animal cruelty - Supermarket Secrets
(Aug 05) featured Hillside footage of RSPCA 'monitored' Freedom Food
farm.

Sky News (Jan 06) Hillside investigation footage was broadcast
exposing the appalling conditions that ducks being produced for M&S,
Morrisons and Iceland are kept in!

Daily Mirror Monday 24th April reported another Hillside investigation
- we filmed turkeys being sadistically beaten at Bernard Matthews!



. If you would like to view these programmes

Click here for free copy of programme on DVD or video.
http://www.hillside.org.uk/acatalog/videos.html


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 09:23:59 UTC
Permalink
http://www.hillside.org.uk/investigations/investigations-slaughter.htm

Men sentenced after we uncover our third illegal slaughterhouse . . .

Despite their own admission in court of running their barbaric
operation for over 15 years, Harold and Michael Gray were sentenced to
only 3 months in prison at Harrogate Crown court on 7th April 2005.
They were also banned from keeping sheep and cattle for 5 and 10 years
respectively. A third man, Sumaullah Patel received a 2 months prison
sentence.

During the trial the judge said that the animals had been slaughtered
using incompetent and botched methods and they had recklessly disposed
of waste material risking serious contamination and endangering humans
and other animals. He added he felt completely satisfied that the
defendants had caused ' pain and distress' to the animals.

Our illegal slaughterhouse investigations began back in 2000, when we
exposed a sickening operation on a farm in Norfolk. Our investigators
secretly filmed farmer Mark Gathercole clumsily hacking at the throats
of live sheep in a filthy ramshackle shed, before chopping up the meat
and selling it on to scores of curry shops and butchers across the
country. After handing our video evidence over to the authorities,
Gathercole pleaded guilty to 20 charges of animal cruelty and running
an illegal slaughterhouse. He we sentenced to three months in prison
and banned from keeping sheep and goats for life.

Then our investigation team travelled to Ripon in North Yorkshire in
2002 to track down Michael Hawkswell who was illegally slaughtering
sheep in a shed using blunt knives. Our team infiltrated Hawkswell's
operation and we secretly filmed him as he held down sheep and goats
while his counterpart Isap Lakha hacked at their throats leaving them
dying in agony.

Hawkswell boasted that he sold the diseased meat to Indian restaurant
owners who disguised it with sauces.

The two men were convicted of cruelty to animals. Hawkswell was sent
to prison for four months and Lakha for two months. The horrified
Judge who sentenced them said at Harrogate court: "The operation was
squalid and cruel. These animals' distress was considerable." Read
More . . .

In both cases the authorities praised Hillside for the professional
way we handled our investigations.

The authorities had apparently spent £250,000 investigating our latest
case without a positive result. It cost Hillside around £2000 to
investigate this and secure the damning evidence which brought this
cruel illicit operation to an end. It is as a direct result of your
support that we were able to fund this operation.




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 09:29:39 UTC
Permalink
Men sentenced after we uncover our third illegal slaughterhouse . . .

http://www.hillside.org.uk/investigations/investigations-slaughter.htm
Despite their own admission in court of running their barbaric
operation for over 15 years, Harold and Michael Gray were sentenced to
only 3 months in prison at Harrogate Crown court on 7th April 2005.
They were also banned from keeping sheep and cattle for 5 and 10 years
respectively. A third man, Sumaullah Patel received a 2 months prison
sentence.

During the trial the judge said that the animals had been slaughtered
using incompetent and botched methods and they had recklessly disposed
of waste material risking serious contamination and endangering humans
and other animals. He added he felt completely satisfied that the
defendants had caused ' pain and distress' to the animals.

Our illegal slaughterhouse investigations began back in 2000, when we
exposed a sickening operation on a farm in Norfolk. Our investigators
secretly filmed farmer Mark Gathercole clumsily hacking at the throats
of live sheep in a filthy ramshackle shed, before chopping up the meat
and selling it on to scores of curry shops and butchers across the
country. After handing our video evidence over to the authorities,
Gathercole pleaded guilty to 20 charges of animal cruelty and running
an illegal slaughterhouse. He we sentenced to three months in prison
and banned from keeping sheep and goats for life.

Then our investigation team travelled to Ripon in North Yorkshire in
2002 to track down Michael Hawkswell who was illegally slaughtering
sheep in a shed using blunt knives. Our team infiltrated Hawkswell's
operation and we secretly filmed him as he held down sheep and goats
while his counterpart Isap Lakha hacked at their throats leaving them
dying in agony.

Hawkswell boasted that he sold the diseased meat to Indian restaurant
owners who disguised it with sauces.

The two men were convicted of cruelty to animals. Hawkswell was sent
to prison for four months and Lakha for two months. The horrified
Judge who sentenced them said at Harrogate court: "The operation was
squalid and cruel. These animals' distress was considerable.

f We
We are pleased to report that as a result of a Hillside
investigation, two men have been sent to prison following
their conviction on ten counts of cruelty to animals.
Michael Hawkswell (26) from Ripon in North Yorkshire
and Isap Lakha (67) from Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, admitted
the charges of cruelly slaughtering goats illegally after being snared
by Hillside investigators.
Our investigation spanned several months after we received
an initial tip-off about Hawkswell’s
barbaric activities. Our informant
told us that Hawkswell was
slaughtering large amounts of goats
and sheep in a shed at the height of
the foot and mouth crisis. He
claimed that the sheep were often
ill, emaciated and diseased.
Hawkswell hacked at their throats
to kill them and then sold the meat
to ethnic restaurants.
After researching into
Hawkswell’s past we discovered that
just two years earlier he had been
sent to prison for animal cruelty
after a lorry load of turkeys he had
abandoned on the A1 actually froze
to death.
Our investigators decided
to pose as ‘dodgy’ meat dealers to
see if Hawkswell would talk to us
about his business. We first met him
at Haswell market in Durham
where he was very keen to offload
his meat to us.
Following several meetings
over a number of weeks, he started
to open up to us and describe his
illicit business in intimate and
alarming detail. Totally unaware that
he was being filmed by hidden cameras, Hawkswell boasted how
he could supply cows, lambs, goats, deer, pigeons and even
peacocks. He then gloated that most of the animals were stolen
from farms late at night, and took great pleasure in pointing out
to us his favourite farms for rustling. He proudly told us of another
sideline he operated – breeding cockerels for fighting. Another
highly illegal and cruel practice!
Hawkswell told our investigators: “My customers don’t care
where the meat is from as long as they get it cheap. I sell to ethnic
restaurants mainly – they take all I have to offer and cover it in
sauce. They don’t care and neither do I.” He shrugged off the
risks of BSE and other diseases saying: “That’s not my problem.”
Then Hawkswell invited us to see how he killed the animals
and prepared the meat for his customers. We went along to
Hawkswell’s ramshackled dirty shed in Londonderry, North
Yorkshire on January 14th 2002 and were introduced to Isap Lakha
and a man called Mr Patel for whom Hawkswell was to slaughter
ten goats that day.
Lakha selected ten goats from the herd and the brutal
slaughter began. Lakha frequently sent one of the investigators
outside to check for the police, so he clearly knew that his
‘activities’
were illegal.
Hillside Investigations Continued . . . Hillside Investigations
Continued . . .
As featured in our October newsletter, these are four of the
six nanny goats we managed to save from the same fate as
those reported above. Through our investigations, we know
that every week, thousands of sheep and goats are illegally
slaughtered in the UK in this appalling manner. Belinda, Gilly,
Geraldine, Sybil, Goldie and Michou are now safe from harm
in the Sanctuary.
Using blunt knives, Lakha hacked at the animals’ throats
before Hawkswell joined in and continued sawing at their throats
with a knife. The pair had been attempting to imitate the Halal
ritual slaughter but their methods were utterly cruel, brutal and
inhumane.
We had teamed up with The People newspaper, and a
group of photographers and reporters were waiting outside the
slaughterhouse ready to follow Lakha back to his house.
Vets who viewed the video of
the slaughtering said it was
‘abhorrently cruel and completely
illegal.’ We handed our case file and
video evidence over to the appropriate
authorities who prosecuted both
Hawkswell and Lakha.
Prosecutor Tony Kelbrick told the
court: “Their method of killing was inept,
clumsy, cruel and caused unnecessary pain
and suffering to the goats.”
The pair first pleaded not guilty
but after seeing the mass of evidence
against them, they changed their plea
to guilty.
At Harrogate Magistrates’ Court
on 3rd February 2003, District Judge
Roy Anderson jailed Lakha for two
months and Hawkswell for four
months. He also banned them from
keeping animals for the next ten years.
The judge told them their method of
killing was “inept, callous, squalid
and cruel.” Sentencing the pair the
judge said: “The degree of distress
inflicted on these animals was
considerable and these offences are
so serious that only a custodial
sentence can be justified.”
Here at Hillside we are encouraged that
these two men have been sent to prison as very few people receive
custodial sentences following convictions for cruelty to animals.
However, after seeing for ourselves the degree of unnecessary
pain and suffering endured by these goats we can’t help feeling
that they got off very lightly.
We just hope that once they leave prison they are reformed
characters and will not re-offend.
If you would like to help fund our
Animal Investigation Appeal
please visit our donation page
Caught in the act - Hawkswell and Lakha skinning the
cruelly and illegally slaughtered goats. (This picture is
taken from our video evidence which was presented
in court. The rest is too horrific to print here.)
CUSTODIAL SENTENCE FOR CRUELTY PAIR


In both cases the authorities praised Hillside for the professional
way we handled our investigations.

The authorities had apparently spent £250,000 investigating our latest
case without a positive result. It cost Hillside around £2000 to
investigate this and secure the damning evidence which brought this
cruel illicit operation to an end. It is as a direct result of your
support that we were able to fund this operation.




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 09:25:45 UTC
Permalink
http://www.hillside.org.uk/about-investigations.htm

Hillside's investigation team regularly exposes the appalling
standards of animal welfare endemic in Britain's farming industry. We
work regularly with national press, radio and television and have
created a great deal of awareness amongst the general public.

March 16th 2006 - Ill-treatment case at Cromer Court Following a
Hillside investigation, which brought to light appalling conditions
that animals were living in on a farm near North Walsham, Norfolk
farmers, Maurice Quantrill and June Furness, appeared before Cromer
Magistrates facing charges of ill-treating animals. Having changed
their original plea of ‘not guilty’ to that of ‘guilty’, Mr Quantrill
and Mrs Furness received community service and were ordered to pay
compensation.

At the time of an RSPCA inspection, they would not accept that the
animals were suffering, although Mrs Furness admitted they were thin.
When the vet examined the animals, he reported that most had been
subject to a prolonged period of malnutrition having utilised all
reserves of their body fat and subsequently drawn on their muscle
tissue to sustain life.

Both have now been banned from keeping animals for ten years, with the
exception of pigs.

Our supporters will already know about a bull, who we named Boris, who
we found stuck in three foot of excrement on this farm along with
dozens of other animals who needed help. Sadly, due to his traumatic
ordeal Boris didn't survive.




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 18:33:29 UTC
Permalink
Pam Anderson Narrates KFC Exposé
http://www.kentuckyfriedcruelty.co.uk/anderson-viduk.asp



Other Viewing Options
You won't find Pamela Anderson's new release
http://www.petatv.com/tvpopup/Prefs.asp?video=pam_kfc_uk
at your local multiplex cinema - the former Baywatch star and
longtime animal advocate's latest project is "Kentucky Fried Cruelty",
an undercover exposé blowing the whistle on the cruel treatment of
animals at KFC's factory farm and slaughterhouse suppliers. The video
details just how horribly KFC treats chickens - birds at a UK
supplier's farm are so crippled that they can't even walk,
http://www.kentuckyfriedcruelty.com/ukinvest.asp
live birds are forced into tanks of scalding-hot water while
completely conscious and able to feel pain, and slaughterhouse workers
at a U.S. KFC supplier
http://www.peta.org/feat/moorefield/
kill birds by slamming them against the wall and stomping on them.

PETA is calling on consumers to boycott KFC until the company agrees
to make some simple improvements
http://www.kentuckyfriedcruelty.com/animals.asp
in the way it treats animals, but so far the company has done nothing
to address the very worst abuses that chickens suffer at its factory
farm and slaughterhouse suppliers. The world's leading animal welfare
experts have even weighed in, giving KFC detailed scientific
recommendations based on the latest research - but KFC has refused to
listen to them. Until the company agrees to take animal welfare
seriously, compassionate consumers everywhere will be taking their
business elsewhere.

You can help chickens! Please e-mail Pamela's video
http://www.petatv.com/tvpopup/Prefs.asp?video=pam_kfc_uk
to all your friends to help spread the word about KFC's cruel
treatment of chickens, and read up on other ways that you can get
involved. Of course, the best thing that you can do to help animals is
to stop eating them, so please consider trying a vegetarian diet -
just like Pamela. http://www.vegetarianstarterkit.co.uk/





"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 18:36:19 UTC
Permalink
Def Leppard's Phil Collen Talks to PETA About Being Vegetarian
Enter to Win a Fender Guitar Signed by Def Leppard's Phil Collen
http://www.goveg.com/f-philcollen.asp
Please install Flash to view this content.



Legendary heavy-metal band Def Leppard is as hot as ever with the
recent release of its critically acclaimed album Yeah!, a hard-driving
tribute to the glam rockers who inspired its sound. Currently in the
midst of a whirlwind world tour, Def Leppard guitarist Phil Collen
took time out of his busy schedule to record a public service
announcement (PSA) for PETA in which he sings the praises of a
vegetarian diet. "Not only is a vegetarian lifestyle healthier, it's
better for the animals and for the environment," says Collen, who has
been a vegetarian for more than 20 years. "So what are you waiting
for? Go veggie!"

Making the connection between living, breathing animals and the
carved-up bodies on his plate is what convinced Collen to forsake
flesh once and for all. "It started freaking me out, eating dead body
parts," he says. "The whole 'Jeffrey Dahmer fridge' concept of things
was weird." Collen credits his healthy diet with giving him the
stamina to embark on a world tour as he approaches the half-century
mark. "Playing shows around the world takes tons of energy. Being
vegetarian has made a huge difference."

Collen feels so strongly about the benefits of a vegetarian diet that
he has encouraged his children to steer clear of animal products too.
His 16-year-old son, Rory, is a lifelong vegetarian. Collen's healthy
and compassionate choices have also rubbed off on his bandmates:
Drummer Rick Allen also shuns meat for ethical reasons and lead singer
Joe Elliott refuses to eat cows, pigs, chickens, or turkeys.

Watch Phil Collen's PSA and hear more of what he has to say about the
rock-and-roll vegetarian lifestyle.



"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 18:38:14 UTC
Permalink
Vegetarian 101

http://www.goveg.com/vegetarian101.asp
When it comes to vegetarianism, the number one question on most
meat-eaters' minds is, "What do you eat?" The answer: Anything we
want! There are vegetarian alternatives to almost any animal food,
from soy sausages and "Fib Ribs" to Tofurky jerky and mock lobster.
Vegetarian-friendly menus are sprouting up everywhere—even Burger King
offers veggie burgers—and more and more eateries are focusing
exclusively on vegetarian and vegan foods. There are fantastic
alternatives to every dairy product you can imagine, including Soy
Delicious ice cream, Silk chocolate soy milk, Tofutti cream cheese,
and more.

Going vegetarian has never been easier, and we're here to help! From
our fantastic recipes and list of favorite products and favorite
vegetarian cookbooks to our free vegetarian starter kit and online
shopping guide, PETA has all the information you need to adopt a
healthy and humane vegetarian diet!

Every year in the U.S., more than 27 billion animals are slaughtered
for food. Raising animals on factory farms is cruel and ecologically
devastating. Eating animals is bad for our health, leading directly to
many diseases and illnesses, including heart attacks, strokes, cancer,
diabetes, and obesity. In response to animal welfare, health, and
ecological concerns, compassionate people everywhere are adopting a
vegetarian diet.
For Animals
Animals on factory farms are treated like meat, milk, and egg
machines. Chickens have their beaks seared off with a hot blade, and
male cows and pigs are castrated without painkillers. All farmed
chickens, turkeys, and pigs spend their brief lives in dark and
crowded warehouses, many of them so cramped that they can't even turn
around or spread a single wing. They are mired in their own waste, and
the stench of ammonia fills the air. Animals raised for food are bred
and drugged to grow as large as possible as quickly as possible—many
are so heavy that they become crippled under their own weight and die
within inches of their water supply.

Animals on factory farms do not see the sun or get a breath of fresh
air until they are prodded and crammed onto trucks for a nightmarish
ride to the slaughterhouse, often through weather extremes and always
without food or water. Many die during transport, and others are too
sick or weak to walk off the truck after they reach the
slaughterhouse. The animals who survive this hellish ordeal are hung
upside-down and their throats are slit, often while they're completely
conscious. Many are still alive while they are skinned, hacked into
pieces, or scalded in the defeathering tanks. Learn more about the
factory-farming industry.
For Your Health
Some of the leading killers in America today, including heart disease,
cancer, obesity, and strokes, are directly linked to meat-based diets.
Heart disease is the number one cause of death in America today, and
it is caused by the build-up of cholesterol and saturated fat from
animal products in our arteries. The only two doctors in human history
who have successfully reversed heart disease have included an
exclusively vegetarian diet as a part of their programs. The average
vegan cholesterol level is 133 (compared to 210 for meat-eaters);
there are no documented cases of heart attacks in individuals with
cholesterol under 150. Other health problems tied to clogged arteries,
like poor circulation and atherosclerotic strokes, can be virtually
eliminated with a vegan diet.

"Chew on This: 30 Reasons
to Go Vegetarian"



Vegans are approximately one-ninth as likely to be obese as
meat-eaters and have a cancer rate that is only 40 percent that of
meat-eaters. People who consume animal products are also at increased
risk for many other illnesses, including strokes, obesity,
osteoporosis, arthritis, Alzheimer's, multiple allergies, diabetes,
and food poisoning. Learn more about the health benefits of a
vegetarian diet.
For the Environment
America's meat addiction is poisoning and depleting our potable water,
arable land, and clean air. More than half of the water used in the
United States today goes to animal agriculture, and since farmed
animals produce 130 times more excrement than the human population,
the run-off from their waste is fouling our waterways. Animal
excrement emits gases, such as hydrogen sulfide and ammonia, that
poison the air around farms, as well as methane and nitrous oxide,
which are major contributors to global warming. Forests are being
bulldozed to make more room for factory farms and feed crops to feed
farmed animals, and this destruction causes soil erosion and
contributes to species extinction and habitat loss. Raising animals
for food also requires massive amounts of food and raw materials:
Farmed animals consume 70 percent of the corn, wheat, and other grains
that we grow, and one-third of all the raw materials and fossil fuels
used in the U.S. go to raising animals for food. In short, our
country's meat addiction is wrecking the earth. Read more about
factory farming and the environment.

Request a vegetarian starter kit to get started today!



"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 18:40:57 UTC
Permalink
By combining electro-pop, ’70s cop sitcom theme music, Bollywood
soundtracks, cheerleading chants, hip hop and noise guitar, The Go!
Team are the new Prozac. We have no intention of missing our fix, and
we’re not alone – NME called The Go! Team “one of the greatest bands
in the world today”. But when i-D exclaimed, “All hail the new kings
and queens of chaos”, we mistakenly thought they were referring to us
(naturally). When we realised the praise was directed at The Go! Team,
we determined a meeting of the minds was in order and immediately
contacted band leader Ian Parton.

As it turns out, Ian is not only a vegetarian but also a prolific
curser and no-nonsense straight shooter who cuts through the bullshit
like a freshly sharpened knife. Plus, he and his bandmates did
single-handedly turn our frowns upside-down, so we decided to clear
the air, allow them their title and administer your daily dose. Open
wide.

We heard you were approached to be in a McDonald’s ad but refused. Can
you tell us more about this?
Well, an ad agency wanted to pitch a Go! Team song to McDonald’s, but
we wouldn’t let it get to that stage. I can honestly say that no
amount of money would persuade me.

One of our biggest campaigns at the moment is against KFC. What
message do you have for companies like KFC that think it is acceptable
to treat animals cruelly?
I just find it bizarre – the massive gulf between the marketing of
KFC, which plays on the whole soul food, hanging-out-with-friends
angle, and the battery farm reality. They’re clever fuckers to create
that diversion to the point where you don’t think about the process
behind it. I’m sure it would put people off for life.



How’s the tour going? Any highlights from SXSW?
Wicked – SXSW is a bit schmoozy, but you can avoid all that shit. We
played on a funny Washington, DC, kid’s cable TV show the other day,
called Pancake Mountain. About 60 kids invaded our soundcheck and were
dancing around on stage. That was pretty funny.

What is your favourite city that you have played so far? What do you
generally eat on the road?
Glasgow, in Scotland, is the rowdiest crowd, no doubt. I eat the same
shit on the road as I always do. America and Japan are the trickiest
places to get veggie stuff, but there’s always a way.

So, how long have you been a vegetarian? What pushed you to make the
switch?
About eight years, I think. I always had this nagging guilt about meat
before that and decided it made sense to just cut it out to ease my
conscience. I think you should just do what you can. If you cut meat
out, it’s one good thing you can do.

What do you know about factory farming, and how did that influence
your decision to go vegetarian?
If you see images of the shit that goes on, I think most people would
at least contemplate giving it up. But most people just want to put it
out of their mind.

We’ve heard that Brighton is a great place for vegetarian food. Any
favourite places to eat?
Yeah, I think it has more veggie restaurants than most cities. Fugazi
name-checked a place called Food For Friends on stage a few years ago.

What’s up next for the band?
We’re supporting the Flaming Lips on four UK dates in a couple of
weeks, which is a big deal for us. Then, off to Coachella in the
desert. Better start writing some more goddamn songs as well.


‘Chew on This’
hellogoodbye
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
Free for All




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:00:37 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 19:40:57 +0100, Ice <***@foobaa.com> wrote:


http://www.peta.org.uk/
Post by Ice
By combining electro-pop, ’70s cop sitcom theme music, Bollywood
soundtracks, cheerleading chants, hip hop and noise guitar, The Go!
Team are the new Prozac. We have no intention of missing our fix, and
we’re not alone – NME called The Go! Team “one of the greatest bands
in the world today”. But when i-D exclaimed, “All hail the new kings
and queens of chaos”, we mistakenly thought they were referring to us
(naturally). When we realised the praise was directed at The Go! Team,
we determined a meeting of the minds was in order and immediately
contacted band leader Ian Parton.
As it turns out, Ian is not only a vegetarian but also a prolific
curser and no-nonsense straight shooter who cuts through the bullshit
like a freshly sharpened knife. Plus, he and his bandmates did
single-handedly turn our frowns upside-down, so we decided to clear
the air, allow them their title and administer your daily dose. Open
wide.
We heard you were approached to be in a McDonald’s ad but refused. Can
you tell us more about this?
Well, an ad agency wanted to pitch a Go! Team song to McDonald’s, but
we wouldn’t let it get to that stage. I can honestly say that no
amount of money would persuade me.
One of our biggest campaigns at the moment is against KFC. What
message do you have for companies like KFC that think it is acceptable
to treat animals cruelly?
I just find it bizarre – the massive gulf between the marketing of
KFC, which plays on the whole soul food, hanging-out-with-friends
angle, and the battery farm reality. They’re clever fuckers to create
that diversion to the point where you don’t think about the process
behind it. I’m sure it would put people off for life.
How’s the tour going? Any highlights from SXSW?
Wicked – SXSW is a bit schmoozy, but you can avoid all that shit. We
played on a funny Washington, DC, kid’s cable TV show the other day,
called Pancake Mountain. About 60 kids invaded our soundcheck and were
dancing around on stage. That was pretty funny.
What is your favourite city that you have played so far? What do you
generally eat on the road?
Glasgow, in Scotland, is the rowdiest crowd, no doubt. I eat the same
shit on the road as I always do. America and Japan are the trickiest
places to get veggie stuff, but there’s always a way.
So, how long have you been a vegetarian? What pushed you to make the
switch?
About eight years, I think. I always had this nagging guilt about meat
before that and decided it made sense to just cut it out to ease my
conscience. I think you should just do what you can. If you cut meat
out, it’s one good thing you can do.
What do you know about factory farming, and how did that influence
your decision to go vegetarian?
If you see images of the shit that goes on, I think most people would
at least contemplate giving it up. But most people just want to put it
out of their mind.
We’ve heard that Brighton is a great place for vegetarian food. Any
favourite places to eat?
Yeah, I think it has more veggie restaurants than most cities. Fugazi
name-checked a place called Food For Friends on stage a few years ago.
What’s up next for the band?
We’re supporting the Flaming Lips on four UK dates in a couple of
weeks, which is a big deal for us. Then, off to Coachella in the
desert. Better start writing some more goddamn songs as well.
‘Chew on This’
hellogoodbye
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
Free for All
"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie
A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:06:51 UTC
Permalink
http://www.runningofthenudes.com/photos.asp

Tired of the same old bull? Then add some spice to your life by
running with a sexy new crowd this year during Pamplona’s Festival of
San Fermin! For the sixth straight year, hundreds of compassionate and
fun-loving people from around the world, wearing little more than
plastic bull horns, will be gathering in Pamplona for PETA’s “Running
of the Nudes” before the annual “Running of the Bulls” begins. How
about slipping into something more comfortable – like your birthday
suit – and joining us for this festive, cheeky event which is full of
babes, not bulls? Speaking of babes, check out the profiles and pics
of these hot-to-trot hotties you could be partying with in Pamplona
this year!

Emily Brown, 28
Hometown: Lisbon, Portugal
Hobbies: Painting, walking on the beach, body-boarding and cooking
Turn-Ons: Sensitive, compassionate people who share a similar interest
in helping animals
Turn-Offs: Meat-eaters, violence, bigots and George Bush
Favourite Vegan Foods: Vegan Spaghetti Bolognese and Tofu Thai Green
Curry
Reason for Participating: “People shouldn’t sit on the fence. I really
wanted to encourage people to speak up and stand up for what they
believe in.”
Preparation: “I’ll be doing as many interviews as possible with the
media. I’ll also be buying some new white knickers!”

Christina Cho, 27
Hometown: Dekalb, Illinois
Hobbies: Bowling, cooking, travelling, hiking, getting massages and
spa treatments, going to the beach, working out, karate, playing
piano, road trips, video poker, karaoke and shopping
Turn-Ons: Compassion, intelligence, independence and love
Turn-Offs: Meat farts, rotten colons, people who are inconsiderate,
anything or anyone that abuses or exploits animals, circus clowns, the
sound of toilets flushing, horror movies and back-seat drivers
Favourite Vegan Foods: Chicken-style rolled tacos, meatless meatballs,
mock chicken parmigiana, tacos, vegan mac and cheese, Tofurky slices,
Gardenburger breakfast sausages and anything with tofu
Animal Rights Turning Point: John Feldmann and Goldfinger’s “Free Me”
video

Laura Davies, 23
Hometown: Leicestershire, UK
Favourite Colour: Black
Hobbies: Socialising, animal rights demos, looking after and
rehabilitating animals (especially primates!), listening to music and
going to festivals/gigs
Turn-Ons: People with a similar interest in ending the suffering of
animals, The Pixies
Turn-Offs: Ignorance, animal abuse/neglect, idiots, the countryside
alliance and George Bush
Favourite Vegan Foods: My mom’s vegan lasagne, vegan chocolate ice
cream and spaghetti carbonara
Reason for Participating: “To add to the number of people there
showing others that we will not back down until the Running of the
Bulls and bullfighting are brought to an end.”
Preparation: “I’ll make sure that as many people as possible that I
know are going also (the more people, the greater the impact!), do any
media work necessary, and get incredibly excited to see everyone there
from last year again!”

Cedric Eggenspiller, 28
Hometown: Toulouse, France
Favourite Colour: Dark red
Hobbies: Singing and playing bass and other instruments
Turn-Ons: People who express what they have deep inside, deep and
powerful music and sensual pictures and movies
Turn-Offs: Any kind of violence towards living beings and people who
say they will never change their ways even if they know their
behaviour hurts or kills
Favourite Vegan Foods: Asian vegan food
Reason for Participating: “It was such a great experience to be part
of this major animal rights event in the past years that it has become
something I would not miss.”
Preparation: “I’ll make sure my horns are strong and shiny!”


Christine Hannes, 26
Hometown: Schoten, Belgium
Favourite Colours: Pink and silver
Hobbies: Going to the theatre, listening to music, dancing, cooking,
eating and spending time with friends and family
Turn-Ons: Cabaret, comedies and disco music
Turn-Offs: People who hurt children or animals and people who don’t
respect human or animal rights
Favourite Vegan Foods: Burgers and fries, lasagne, pizza, cakes,
Belgian fries, chocolate
Reason for Participating: “I’m going to the Running of the Nudes
because the ‘culture’ of bullfighting is just awful. This is what got
me interested in animal rights in the first place. I saw it on TV when
I was little, and I was really shocked. And I still am – it’s so
brutal and plain stupid. It should be stopped as soon as possible. And
it’s our job to show these people that this kind of animal abuse has
to stop! And the way PETA does it is great! We show people that there
is a much nicer, more peaceful alternative.”
Preparation: “I’ll try not to get fat! And I’m going to see a video in
some of my classes about bullfighting. I don’t have any other special
preparation yet, but I’m always willing to do something special!”

Alice Rallier, 27
Hometown: Saint-Saulve, France
Favourite Colour: Pink
Hobbies: Enjoying good friends, good food, nice walks in the mountains
with my two vegetarian dogs, Litchi and Tara, and swimming in the sea
Turn-Ons: Opening someone’s heart to animal suffering and to how he or
she can help end it, breathing fresh air, feeling the sun on my face
and the grass under my feet. I think that everybody on Earth should be
allowed to enjoy these simple things too.
Turn-Offs: The useless suffering of all beings
Favourite Vegan Foods: Chips and waffles made with oat milk, flour, a
bit of vegetable oil and a pinch of ginger, vegetables from Southern
France cooked with olive oil and vegan versions of traditional French
treats
Reason for Participating: “To help stop the cruel bull run and all the
bullfights that still take place in Pamplona and to have fun with
life-loving and cool people from all countries. I can’t wait to get
there. There’s such a fantastic atmosphere.”
Preparation: “I’m thinking about the words I could find to make
bullfighting lovers turn into life lovers. As a kind of ‘Pamplona
fashion victim’, I’m also looking for the T-shirt that I’m going to
wear this year. I think I’ve found it! It’s on PETA’s Web site and
says, ‘Compassion Is Super Sexy’ on it!”

Lady Sara Rönneke
Hometown: Gothenburg, Sweden
Favourite Colour: Yellow, pink and red
Hobbies: Singing, acting, spending time with my cats and other
friends, exercising, being outdoors, watching films, reading books,
climbing trees, giving and receiving presents and eating chocolate
Turn-Ons: Fit, clever people, outdoor pursuits and feeling successful
and elated
Turn-Offs: The complete selfishness exhibited by so many humans, which
often leads to the cruel exploitation of fellow human and non-human
beings and our planet, bigots, lack of personal hygiene and smoking
Favourite Vegan Foods: Swedish Glace, vegan pancakes, hummus, muesli,
Ryvita with peanut butter, vegan pizza, olives, pasta with vegan
pesto, Thai tofu dishes, falafel, apple or berry crumble, Booja Booja
chocolate pralines and vegan Swedish cinnamon buns
Reason for Participating: “Because there is absolutely no excuse in
today’s civilised world to abuse animals for entertainment. It is
important, however, to have a good time! I think PETA is excellent at
showing people how this is done.”
Preparation: “Get fit and spread the message!”


Sundal Roy, 20
Hometown: Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Favourite Colours: Yellow, green and dark red
Hobbies: Designing cool clothes, shopping in charity shops, listening
to music and dancing
Turn-Ons: People who look after themselves by eating well and being
active, people being true to themselves and expressing their
individuality
Turn-Offs: Apathy, cruelty to animals, children, fellow human beings
and our planet
Favourite Vegan Foods: Sweet and sour stir-fry with carrots, peppers,
mushrooms, broccoli, tofu chunks, sunflower seeds, raisins and
pineapple over noodles
Reason for Participating: “Because the abolition of bullfighting is a
really good cause to fight/party for. By providing an alternative, not
only are we more likely to abolish bullfighting itself, we are also
drawing people’s attention to what a cruel practice it is. On top of
that, we are also demonstrating to those ‘fence-sitters’ that we are
putting ourselves out there for something we believe in, and it is
making some difference, and that they can do the same. And have a lot
of fun doing it too!”
Preparation: “First, I’ll get up to speed on all the campaign
information so I can educate locals and tourists about the cruelty of
bullfighting, then I’ll try to learn some Spanish, pack lots of
sunscreen and shave!”

Joanne Sim, 21
Hometown: Thurso, Caithness, Scotland
Favourite Colour: Purple
Hobbies: Taking environmental studies classes and listening to live
music
Turn-Ons: Guys who have goals in life and try hard to achieve them,
guys who can sing and the odd cocktail or two!
Turn-Offs: Eating kebabs and the statement “Ignorance Is Bliss”
Favourite Vegan Foods: Marinated tofu pieces, Tofutti, Linda
McCartney’s Deep Country Pies
Animal Rights Turning Point: “About 10 years ago, I picked up an
animal rights magazine and read about the overcrowded, foul conditions
animals were made to live in on factory farms and instantly made the
decision not to eat meat. The more I learnt, the more disgusted I was
at how animals were, and still are, treated by humans. I now work with
Scotland’s leading animal protection organisation, Advocates for
Animals.”

Anita Singh, 30
Hometown: Madras, India
Favourite Colour: Deep chocolate brown
Hobbies: Ice skating, having fun and hanging out with friends,
reading, listening to music, travelling and visiting galleries
Turn-Ons: Compassionate vegetarian/vegan men who aren’t afraid to show
their sensitive side
Turn-Offs: Any form of cruelty to animals, people who eat meat and
people who break their promises
Favourite Vegan Foods: Salads, veggie sausage and mash, veggie
burgers, ratatouille, Indian aubergine and potato curry
Reason for Participating: “I went in 2005 and had a wicked time! I met
fantastic people from all over the world, and together, we were able
to raise awareness in the local people to just how barbaric
bullfighting actually is. We were able to bring fun and excitement for
one day to a town that usually thrives on cruelty. I am going in 2006
to reunite with old friends, make new ones and also do my part to help
stamp out the notoriously cruel tradition of bullfighting and banish
it to the dustbins of history where it belongs!”

Peter Steffensen, 29
Hometown: Aarhus, Denmark
Favourite Colour: Green, red
Hobbies: Cooking, volunteering at an animal shelter, coordinating
various activities against cruelty to animals, being among friends,
animals, nature and travelling
Turn-Ons: Switches, nice smiles, calm and positive attitudes,
intelligence and active people
Turn-Offs: Also switches, the seven deadly sins, injustice, cruelty,
feeling powerless – which I seldom do!
Favourite Vegan Foods: Can’t name just one, but I seem to include
pineapple in a dish quite often!
Reason for Participating: “To make a difference!”
Preparation: “To try to learn the story behind the bull run and try to
understand the way the actors in this event think, because I think it
is very important to understand them in order to be able to talk to
them! And of course, a good workout.”


Yvonne Taylor, 33
Hometown: Edinburgh, Scotland
Favourite Colour: Red
Hobbies: Playing with my dog, Zack, watching movies and travelling
Turn-Ons: Guys who have a purpose in life (especially when that
purpose is animal rights), rats
Turn-Offs: Anyone who doesn’t adore being around animals, broccoli and
coriander
Favourite Vegan Foods: Veggie haggis!
Animal Rights Turning Point: “After many years as a vegetarian, I
picked up a PETA magazine and suddenly read about all the other issues
like dairy and eggs. I went vegan immediately, and that was 12 years
ago.”


Lena Sliussarchik, 25
Hometown: Kharkov, Ukraine
Favourite Colour: Crimson
Hobbies: Sports, reading, travelling and acting in movies
Turn-Ons: Sex and music
Turn-Offs: The imperfection of our world and its people, depression
Favourite Vegan Foods: Rice with vegetables
Reason for Participating: “To make the world better.”
Preparation: “I’ll be keeping myself in sport form and telling [people
about the upcoming] event.”


Lilián Kimberly Jerónimo Morales, 18
Hometown: Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands
Favourite Colour: Pink
Hobbies: Reading, watching movies with subtitles, going out with
friends and/or my boyfriend, preparing raw vegan food and travelling
around the vegetarian world
Turn-Ons: Sincere, sensitive and spiritual people with great hearts
Turn-Offs: Food that isn’t raw, murder, cruelty, injustice,
corpse-eaters (carnivorous people), ignorant people and people who
don’t respect nature
Favourite Vegan Foods: Mixed salads, raw alternatives to cookies and
breads, sweet fruits and pottages




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:08:11 UTC
Permalink
http://www.peta.org.uk/feat/pink-queenletter.asp

P!nk's Plea to the Queen: 'Save the Bears!'
Animal-loving pop singer P!nk has written an impassioned plea to the
queen urging her to back calls for switching to faux fur for the
Buckingham Palace guards' ceremonial hats. She fired off the letter
ahead of her appearance at the Prince's Trust 30th Birthday concert at
the Tower of London on 20 May.

P!nk, like many people, was shocked to learn from PETA that these hats
continue to be made from the skins of Canadian black bears. It can
take the entire hide of one bear to make just one guard's headpiece.
The skins come from bears shot in Canada, including many who are shot
several times before they die. Some escape the hunters and bleed to
death. When mother bears are killed, orphaned cubs are left behind to
starve.

After months of campaigning, PETA reached the negotiating table with
the Ministry of Defence (MoD) and is now working with several leading
faux-fur manufacturers in the hopes of supplying the MoD with a
beautiful synthetic fabric which would replace the real bear skins.
Although coming to the negotiating table is clearly a step in the
right direction for the MoD, Queen Elizabeth II and the MoD continue
to allow bears to be killed for these hats while research is underway.

“I know that your Army Drummers' cool leopard-skin aprons are
synthetic and that the Royal Horse Artillery has fabulous faux-beaver
caps. Isn't it about time that your five Regiments of Foot Guards
joined your other ranks by replacing real fur? Sorry to be a royal
pain, but my feelings reflect the sentiment of a new generation that
respects animals.” P!nk goes on to urge the queen not to allow
“Britain's reputation as a nation of animal lovers” to be “tarnished
by these money-grabbing hunters”.

PETA has enlisted high-profile support for the campaign from Sir Roger
Moore, Morrissey, Julian Clary, Pamela Anderson, Twiggy, Amanda
Holden, Hayley Mills, Imogen Bailey and others in calling for a ban on
bear fur in the guards' headwear.

For more information, please go to unbearablecruelty.com.

Read P!nk's letter to the queen.

The following are some ways you can help:

Donate online now to help stop the killing of bears for their fur.
Your donation will also support our many other campaigns to end animal
abuse.
Print out PETA's petition about this issue, and collect signatures to
show Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth that Britons won't tolerate the
killing of bears for the guards' hats.
Write a polite letter requesting a reply and urging Queen Elizabeth
and Prince Charles to call on the Ministry of Defence to immediately
stop killing bears while it works on replacing the real fur used to
make the guards' hats with a cruelty-free faux fur:
The Private Secretary to Her Majesty the Queen
Buckingham Palace
London SW1A 1AA

The Private Secretary to His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales
Clarence House
London SW1A 1BA

Educate others about the horrors of the fur industry. Forward this
video to friends.
Sign the online petition calling on the queen to end the barbaric use
of real bearskins for her guards' caps. Also, see peta2's petition
here.



"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:09:19 UTC
Permalink
http://unbearablecruelty.com/nakedtruth.asp

Nude PETA Members Tell the Naked Truth About Bearskins
Wearing nothing but bear masks and with their nude bodies sprawled on
the ground, dozens of members of People for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals (PETA) Europe – symbolizing black bears slaughtered in Canada
for the palace guards' caps – held a “die-in” in Parliament Square on
Sunday calling on Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth and the Ministry of
Defence to stop the needless killing of bears for the guards'
ceremonial headwear. Four PETA activists who were without masks held
signs that read, “Bears Slaughtered for Queen's Guards –
Indefensible!”

The provocative display comes as Parliamentary Early Day Motion (EDM)
1756, which calls for the use of faux fur in the guards' caps, has so
far garnered the signatures of almost 170 compassionate MPs. This
motion could lead to a debate about the continued indefensible use of
real bear fur for ceremonial headgear. The EDM enables MPs to draw
attention to the issue and generate support for their views by
inviting other MPs to add their signatures. The more MPs who sign EDM
1756, the greater the chances it will be debated in the House of
Commons.

You Can Help!
Bears aren't crops to be "harvested"; they are individuals who live in
families and feel pain and terror when they are shot. Today, please
ask your MP (you can find his or her name and contact information by
typing in your postcode at www.locata.co.uk/commons or by calling 020
7219 4272) to sign EDM 1756 and urge the British government to stop
its continued financial support of the slaughter of black bears for
ceremonial purposes.




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:10:00 UTC
Permalink
Ralph Lauren Goes Fur-Free!
Ralph Lauren, long recognized as a leader in fashion, is now also a
leader in compassion after announcing a precedent-setting decision to
no longer use fur in any of his apparel or home collections, based
purely on ethical grounds.

The Polo Ralph Lauren Corporation had been considering eliminating fur
from its lines for some time and finally issued a statement making its
decision to go fur-free official after a series of meetings with PETA
during which executives viewed grisly undercover video footage of fur
farms in China, where more than half the finished fur garments
imported for sale in the United States are sourced. Shortly after
meetings with PETA in February and March 2006, the company committed
to pulling all fur from its shelves. “Fur has never been an integral
part of our design strategy …,” said a Polo Ralph Lauren spokesperson.
“We are publicly announcing this decision because the use of fur has
been under review internally and we feel that the time is right to
take this action.”

On fur farms in China, animals are confined to tiny wire cages through
all weather extremes. Before they are skinned, workers bludgeon them
with metal rods and slam them against the ground, breaking their bones
but not always killing them. Many animals are skinned while they are
still alive.

The Polo Ralph Lauren Corporation sent PETA a signed statement of
assurance acknowledging its intent to pull all advertising for fur,
cancel all pending orders for fur products, and beginning with its
holiday 2006 collections, no longer sell any fur products. Twelve
hundred of its brand-new fall 2006 fur-trimmed coats will be donated
to charities in developing nations.

Ralph Lauren’s compassionate, progressive decision sends a powerful
message to the clothing industry that torturing and killing rabbits,
raccoons, foxes, and other animals for fashion won’t be tolerated.
What You Can Do
If you know someone who still wears fur, urge him or her to watch this
video. Also, please write to Ralph Lauren and thank him for this
decision:

Ralph LaurenPolo Ralph Lauren Corporation
650 Madison Ave.
New York, NY 10022
***@polo.com




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:11:40 UTC
Permalink
http://www.fishinghurts.com/

Dr. Sylvia Earle, one of the world's leading marine biologists, said,
"I never eat anyone I know personally. I wouldn't deliberately eat a
grouper any more than I'd eat a cocker spaniel. They're so
good-natured, so curious. You know, fish are sensitive, they have
personalities, they hurt when they're wounded." A recent issue of Fish
and Fisheries, devoted to learning, cited more than 500 research
papers on fish intelligence, proving that fish are smart, that they
can use tools, and that they have impressive long-term memories and
sophisticated social structures.
Many people have never stopped to think about it, but fish are smart,
interesting animals with their own unique personalities—just like the
dogs and cats we share our homes with. Did you know that fish can
learn to avoid nets by watching other fish in their group and that
they can recognize individual "shoal mates"? Some fish gather
information by eavesdropping on others, and some—such as the South
African fish who lay eggs on leaves so that they can carry them to a
safe place—even use tools.

Scientists are starting to learn more and more about our finned
friends, and their discoveries are fascinating:

• A recent issue of Fish and Fisheries, devoted to learning, cited
more than 500 research papers on fish intelligence, proving that fish
are smart, that they can use tools, and that they have impressive
long-term memories and sophisticated social structures. The
introductory chapter said that fish are "steeped in social
intelligence, pursuing Machiavellian strategies of manipulation,
punishment and reconciliation … exhibiting stable cultural traditions
and cooperating to inspect predators and catch food."

• Culum Brown, a University of Edinburgh biologist who is studying the
evolution of cognition in fish, says, "Fish are more intelligent than
they appear. In many areas, such as memory, their cognitive powers
match or exceed those of 'higher' vertebrates, including non-human
primates." Their long-term memories help fish keep track of complex
social relationships. Their spatial memory—"equal in all respects to
any other vertebrate"—allows them to create cognitive maps that guide
them through their watery homes, using cues such as polarized light,
sounds, smells, and visual landmarks.

• Dr. Phil Gee, a psychologist from the University of Plymouth, says
that fish can tell what time of day it is, and he trained fish to
collect food by pressing a lever at specific times. He says "fish have
a memory span of at least three months," and they "are probably able
to adapt to changes in their circumstances, like any other small
animals and birds."

• "We're now finding that [fish] are very capable of learning and
remembering, and possess a range of cognitive skills that would
surprise many people."
—Dr. Theresa Burt de Perera, Oxford University

• A scientific review presented to the Australian Veterinary
Association completely disproved the old myth that goldfish have
three-second memories; instead, the veterinarians found that goldfish
have impressive memories and problem-solving abilities. One of the
researchers said that after conducting the review, they wanted “to get
the message out to vets to start looking more closely at fish and
considering their welfare like they do other animals.”
—The Sunday Times, May 28, 2006

• "Australian crimson spotted rainbowfish, which learnt to escape from
a net in their tank, remembered how they did it 11 months later. This
is equivalent to a human recalling a lesson learnt 40 years ago."
—Sunday Telegraph, Oct. 3, 2004

DID YOU KNOW?
• Fish talk to each other with squeaks, squeals, and other
low-frequency sounds that humans can hear only with special
instruments.

• Fish like to be touched and often gently rub against one
another—like a cat weaving in and out of your legs.

• Some fish tend well-kept gardens, encouraging the growth of tasty
algae and weeding out the types they don't like.

• Like birds, many fish build nests where they raise their babies;
others collect little rocks off the seafloor to make hiding places
where they can rest.

• Some fish woo potential partners by singing to them, but male sand
gobies, tiny fish who live along the European coast, play "Mr. Mom,"
building and guarding nests and fanning the eggs with their fins to
create a current of fresh, oxygenated water.

Being Hooked Hurts!
A two-year study conducted by scientists at Edinburgh University and
the Roslin Institute in the United Kingdom proved what many marine
biologists have been saying for years: Fish feel pain, just as all
animals do. Anglers may not like to think about it, but fish suffer
when they are impaled in the mouth and pulled into an environment in
which they cannot breathe. Said Dr. Lynne Sneddon, who headed the
recent study, "Really, it's kind of a moral question. Is your angling
more important than the pain to the fish?" If you fish or know someone
who does, click here to learn more.

Some Fish Are Too Clever to Catch!
“According to the researchers, close encounters with nets in early
life can educate the fish to swim away from an approaching trawler. .
. . Emma Jones, a fish behaviorist at the Marine Laboratory, said:
‘And if you have one fish that is a particularly fast learner, the
others will follow.’”
—The Times (London), October 28, 2004

Fish Faux Fish or No Fish
Fish suffer horribly on the journey from sea to supermarket.
Commercial fishing boats use huge nets, some stretching for miles,
which swallow up everything—and everyone—in their paths. Fish come out
of the nets with their skin scraped completely raw from being forced
to rub up against rocks, debris—and other fish—trapped with them.

Fish flesh is frequently contaminated with mercury (which can cause
brain damage) and toxic chemicals like DDT, PCBs, and dioxin (which
have been linked to cancer, nervous system disorders, and fetal
damage), as well as disease—causing bacteria. Why not try faux fish
instead? Vegetarian products like Worthington's Tuno (available in
health food stores) and mock lobster, shrimp, and crab (available
online) have all the taste of the "real thing"—but none of the cruelty
or contaminants.





"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:12:57 UTC
Permalink
http://www.goveg.com/birdflu.asp

Eating Meat Threatens Millions With Bird Flu

Modern factory farms raise animals in extremely unnatural conditions.
Almost all 10 billion land animals who are slaughtered in the U.S.
each year are forced to live in extremely crowded sheds. They are
surrounded by their own filth and breathe ammonia-laden air that
destroys their lungs and compromises their immune systems. It comes as
no surprise that these facilities have become major sources for deadly
disease outbreaks such as hoof-and-mouth disease, mad cow disease,
Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (which is thought by most scientists to
cause Crohn’s disease in humans), and now the most dangerous of all:
bird flu.

Avian influenza, or “bird flu,” threatens humanity with the greatest
public health crisis in recorded history. Experts warn that the
disease could kill one in eight human beings, including 40 million
Americans, and cause a collapse of the world economy.1 According to
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World
Health Organization (WHO), while the virus is destroyed by thorough
cooking, it can be caught simply by eating undercooked meat or eggs,
by eating food prepared on the same cutting board as infected meat or
eggs, or even by touching eggshells contaminated with the disease.2,3

The risk could not be more dire. Senior UN System Coordinator for
Avian and Human Influenza Dr. David Nabarro describes it as a threat
to “the survival of the world as we know it.”4 Dr. Gregory A. Poland
of the Mayo Clinic has called it “what could arguably be the most
horrific disaster in modern history.”5 Other experts describe the
effects on society: “We haven’t even begun to conceive of, to
understand, to comprehend what that may mean for our workplace”;
“[S]chools are closed ... transportation systems are curtailed or shut
down ... Critical infrastructure will or may fail: food, water, power,
gas, electricity”; and “When this happens, time will be described, for
those left living, as before and after the pandemic.”6

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt called the
likelihood of an influenza pandemic “very high, some say even
certain.”7 Just walk into any factory-farm chicken or turkey shed and
it’s easy to see why. One shed houses tens of thousands of birds who
are never allowed outside and are cooped up in their own filth. When
one bird gets sick, the disease can quickly spread to all of them. The
conditions in these sheds provide ideal breeding grounds for
pathogens, with birds living in their own feces from birth to
slaughter and laying hens kept in stacked cages so that feces from the
birds on top fall on the birds below. The air in the sheds is so
filthy with ammonia and dust that it burns their eyes and throats.
(Learn more about the chicken and turkey industries.)

Farmers know that they have created incubation centers for disease
outbreaks, so they dose their animals with massive amounts of drugs.
In fact, in the U.S., chickens receive more than three times as many
antibiotics as people do.8 However, these antibiotics are only
temporarily effective against bacteria and completely useless against
viruses such as the bird flu virus. In fact, widespread use of the
antiviral drug amantadine to control viral outbreaks in animals on
Chinese farms has made the bird flu resistant, rendering the drug
useless to protect people.9 And the problem is not restricted to
birds: Pigs and dairy cows, who live under similarly intensive crowded
and unsanitary conditions can also get and spread this or similar
viruses.10 According to Newsweek, Hans-Gerhard Wagner, a senior
officer with the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization, has called
such “intensive industrial farming of livestock” an “opportunity for
emerging disease.” The article goes on to call factory-farmed chickens
and ducks “veritable flu-making factories.”11


The current strain of bird flu has already spread from Asia to Europe,
infecting 117 people and killing more than half of them.12 Even if
this strain does not cause a pandemic, experts believe that it’s only
a matter of time before another one does. These viruses are constantly
changing, and weaker forms in birds are known to mutate in just months
into highly pathogenic forms for which there exists no effective
treatment or vaccine.13 Outbreaks of other strains are regularly
detected—Pennsylvania alone detects 15 to 20 outbreaks a year.
14,15,16

Every time you put yourself in contact with or consume animal
products, you risk infecting yourself with this or some other deadly
virus. If you are going to eat meat, then ensuring that you and your
family are protected from bird flu and similar food pathogens requires
that you treat your kitchen like a biohazard laboratory. There’s an
easier solution, though—adopting a vegetarian diet.

Order a free vegetarian starter kit, which includes delicious recipes,
and a free DVD, to get started today.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Dana Milbank, "Capitol Hill Flu Briefing Was No Trick, and No
Treat," The Washington Post 13 Oct. 2005: A02.

2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "Update: Guidelines and
Recommendation-Interim Guidance About Avian Influenza A (H5N1) for
U.S. Citizens Living Abroad," 17 Oct. 2005.

3 World Health Organization, "Food Safety Issues," Nov. 2005.

4 Helen Branswell, "'World As We Know It' May Be at Stake: UN Pandemic
Czar," Cnews, 2 Oct. 2005.

5 Milbank.

6 Milbank.

7 Sakchai Lalit, "U.S. Health Secretary Warns of Future Bird Flu
Pandemic," USA Today 10 Oct. 2005.

8 Rich Hayes, "Antibiotics Overused in Chickens," Baltimore Sun 23
Jul. 2001.

9 Alan Sipress, “Bird Flu Drug Rendered Useless,” Washington Post 18
Jun. 2005: A01.

10 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Transmission of
Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People,” 17 Oct. 2005.

11 Alexandra A. Seno, B.J. Lee, and Kay Itoi, “Health: Flu Fears Take
Wing,” Newsweek International 26 Jan. 2005.

12 Anthee Carassava, "EU Holds Urgent Bird Flu Talks," CNN.com, 18
Oct. 2005.

13 World Health Organization, “Avian Influenza Frequently Asked
Questions: Which Viruses Cause Highly Pathogenic Disease?” 3 Nov.
2005.

14 Daniel Patrick Shehan, “Don’t Be Chicken About Bird Flu, Experts
Say,” Morning Call 19 Nov. 2005.

15 Dr. Paul Knepley, state veterinarian, Pennsylvania Department of
Agriculture, personal conversation, 22 Nov. 2005.

16 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Outbreaks in North
America,” 17 Oct. 2005.





"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:14:38 UTC
Permalink
http://www.covancecruelty.co.uk/victory-PETAEU.asp

Victory for PETA Europe:
Covance Drops Lawsuit; Video of Appalling Abuse of Monkeys to Be Shown
Worldwide; Company's False Assurance of Good Welfare Practices Exposed
For 11 months, an investigator from PETA US worked as a technician
inside the Vienna, Virginia, Covance laboratory, where she documented
workers who were striking, choking, taunting and deliberately
tormenting terrified monkeys. Covance sought an injunction and was
able to get a court order temporarily preventing PETA Europe from
showing the undercover footage from inside the Covance animal-testing
facility in the United States. On 16 June, His Honour Judge Langan
handed down judgement in the case for injunctive relief brought by
Covance Laboratories against PETA Europe Ltd, dismissing the case and
calling the arguments against granting an interim injunction
"cumulative and, in my judgment, overwhelming". Furthermore, PETA
Europe was awarded £50,000 on account of its costs. Covance
Laboratories considered appealing this decision, but PETA Europe's
case was so strong that the company withdrew its appeal request and
dropped the entire lawsuit before it was brought in front of the
Appeal Court judges. Covance will now be responsible for paying PETA
Europe's additional legal costs.

The court was presented with the 28-minute video that resulted from
the investigation, causing Judge Langan to comment on the "rough
manner in which the animals [were] handled and the bleakness of the
surroundings in which they are kept", matters which, he said, "cry out
for explanation". The video also shows multiple violations of the US
Animal Welfare Act, which PETA US has detailed in a 272-page complaint
to the US Department of Agriculture. PETA US is also challenging
Covance, which is suing PETA US and its investigator, Lisa Leitten,
over the investigation in the US courts.

Among the violations that PETA US documented at a Covance facility in
Vienna, Virginia, are the following:
Animals with broken limbs deprived of veterinary care and euthanasia;
animals found having seizures; animals with oozing open wounds on
their legs; and animals who had suffered side effects from drugs that
left them in conditions that required mercy killing
Physical and psychological violence against primates by Covance
workers, including sick monkeys jammed forcefully into plastic
restraint tubes and terrified monkeys slammed to the floor, sprayed
with water, intentionally tormented and thrown into their cages after
having drugs forced into their stomachs
Baby monkeys whose noses bled daily because of Covance's failure to
use the proper-size tubes to thread up their noses, down their throats
and into their stomachs to deliver test substances
Chronic diarrhoea caused by stress
Failure to provide the monkeys with socialization and enrichment,
which is required by the AWA, leading to self-mutilation and
repetitive behaviour such as circling, back-flipping and swaying – all
of which have been identified by animal behaviourists as directly
associated with loneliness and a lack of enrichment
In contrast to the abuse uncovered by PETA US, Covance has an animal
welfare statement in which the company claims to treat animals with
"care and respect". Contrasting Covance's claim with the reality
exposed by the PETA US investigation, Judge Langan called it "a
comparison between two different worlds". His Honour went on to say
that to the extent that Covance "has fostered a misleading impression,
PETA Europe is entitled to correct it publicly".

Judge Langan also stated that "in this case the balance comes down in
favour of the truth being told. … As there should be 'truth in
advertising', so there should be truth in publicity. The public should
not be misled".

The court ruling means that the public and the media have the right to
see how monkeys are being systematically abused in the world's largest
testing laboratory. Videotape of animals being hit and choked at
Covance is not proprietary information – it is criminal evidence that
deserves to be seen, and we have won the right show it. The primates
held in those tiny, barren steel cages need protection urgently.


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:16:50 UTC
Permalink
http://www.peta.org.uk/feat/sexyveg2006_winners.asp

The results are in, and PETA Europe is pleased to announce that TOTP
beauty Fearne Cotton and Big Brother’s Big Shout presenter Russell
Brand have been selected as the 2006 winners of PETA Europe’s “Sexiest
Vegetarians” poll. Red-carpet runners-up include GMTV presenter Fiona
Phillips, award-winning musician Damon Albarn, sexy Sadie Frost,
absolutely fabulous Joanna Lumley and multitalented actor and comedian
Alan Davies.

This is the first time PETA Europe has announced UK winners of the
global poll. In PETA’s worldwide contest, more than 40,000 people
voted Kristen Bell and Prince the sexiest vegetarians in the celebrity
world.

Why are so many celebs shunning meat quicker than you can say “veggie
burger”? Celebrities cite many reasons for forgoing flesh, from
avoiding the cruelty inherent in all meat production to improving
their health and energy levels and helping the environment by not
contributing to factory-farm pollution.

Both of this year’s winners are more than just sexy vegetarians –
they’re also active animal lovers. Going vegetarian was an easy choice
for tattooed beauty Fearne Cotton, who has just been announced as the
new presenter of ITV’s Celebrity Love Island. Fearne says, “Being a
veggie is so easy and great, I’m against live transportation and
animal cruelty, so it fits in perfectly with my beliefs. … [V]eggie
food is yummy, my mum makes a mean veg lasagne!”

Man-of-the-moment Russell Brand is more than happy to be branded a
“Big Mouth” when it comes to speaking up for animals. Fans of his BBC
radio show have heard him talk endlessly about animal-related topics,
including the facts that he has been vegetarian for 16 years and that
he named his cat after one of PETA’s biggest supporters, Morrissey!


Previous “Sexiest Vegetarians” include Carrie Underwood, Chris Martin,
Andre 3000, Tobey Maguire, Josh Hartnett, Alicia Silverstone, Lauren
Bush, Shania Twain and Natalie Portman.

Below is the complete list of vegetarian celebs who were in the
running:
Women
Alicia Silverstone
Alison Lohman
Alyssa Milano
Amber Benson
Angela Bassett
Anna Nicole Smith
Anne Hathaway
Annie Lennox
Avril Lavigne
Brigitte Bardot
Bryce Dallas Howard
Carré Otis
Charlotte Ross
Chelsea Clinton
Chely Wright
Chrissie Hynde
Chynna Phillips
Daniele Gaither
Daphne Zuniga
Daryl Hannah
Ember Swift
Emmylou Harris
Erykah Badu
Fearne Cotton
Fiona Apple
Fiona Phillips
Grace Slick
Heather Mills McCartney
India.Arie
Jacklyn Lick
Jane Siberry
Jennie Garth
Joan Jett
Joanna Lumley
Johanna Fateman
Jorja Fox
Joss Stone
Joy Bryant
k.d. lang
Kim Basinger
Kristen Bell
Kylie Bax
Laura Flores
Lauren Bush
Linda Blair
Lindsay Wagner
Lori Petty
Marilu Henner
Mary Tyler Moore
Monica Potter
Naomi Watts
Natalie Imbruglia
Natalie Portman
Nellie McKay
Nicollette Sheridan
Nina Hagen
P!nk
Pamela Anderson
Peaches Geldof
Persia White
Princess Superstar
Rachael Leigh Cook
Rachel Miner
Radha Mitchell
Renee Goldsberry
Sadie Frost
Sarah Chalke
Serenity
Shalom Harlow
Shania Twain
Shannon Elizabeth
Sheryl Lee
Stella McCartney
Summer Phoenix
Tatjana Patitz
Tatum O'Neal
Thora Birch
T'Keyah "Crystal" Keymáh
Traci Bingham
Vanessa A. Williams
Vanessa Ferlito
Veruschka
Wendie Malick

Men
Alan Davies
Alec Baldwin
Alexander Greenwald
Andre 3000
Anthony Kiedis
Benji Madden
Ben Kenney
Billy Baldwin
Billy Martin
Boy George
Brandon Brooks
Brian Bell
Bryan Adams
Carl Lewis
Casey Affleck
Casey Kasem
César López "Vampiro"
Chris Martin
Common
Corey Feldman
Damon Albarn
Dan Abrams
Daniel Johns
Dave Meyers
David Duchovny
Dick Gregory
Don Imus
Ed Begley Jr.
Eddie Vedder
Ed Templeton
Enrique Bunbury
Eric Stoltz
Esai Morales
Forest Whitaker
Gary Anthony Williams
G. Gordon Liddy
Grant Aleksander
Greg Cipes
Ian Grushka
Ian McKellen
Ilan Chester
James Cromwell
Jared Leto
J.D. Fortune
Jeph Howard
Jeru the Damaja
Joaquin Phoenix
Joel Madden
John Cleese
John Feldmann
Jonathan Safran Foer
Jonathan Taylor Thomas
Juan Gabriel
k-os
Kal Penn
Keenen Ivory Wayans
Kenny Loggins
Kevin Eubanks
Kevin Nealon
Kristoff St. John
KRS-One
Laban Pheidias
Larry Mullen Jr.
Leonard Nimoy
Little Richard
M-1
Martin Kemp
Martin Shaw
Masta Killa
Michael Ausiello
Michael Bolton
Michael Franti
Mickey Madden
Mike Dirnt
Milo Ventimiglia
Moby
Morrissey
Mos Def
Murphy Lee
Nick Zinner
Noah Wyle
Omar Epps
Orlando Jones
Phil Collen
Paul McCartney
Perry Farrell
Peter Dinklage
Prince
Prodigy
Q-Tip
Ricky Williams
Rikki Rockett
Russell Brand
RZA
Scott Bourne
Sean Astin
Serj Tankian
Steve Jocz
Thom Yorke
Tobey Maguire
Todd Oldham
Tony La Russa
"Weird Al" Yankovic
Will Estes
Woody Harrelson
Ziggy Marley



"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-18 19:17:53 UTC
Permalink
http://www.peta.org.uk/feat/feat-jodiemarsh_worldcup.asp

“Do it for your performance. Do it for your wives. Do it for England.
Go vegetarian!” says stunning Jodie Marsh in a sexy letter of support
to our boys competing at the World Cup. Hoping to help their
performances both on and off the pitch, Jodie has sent vegetarian
starter kits along with this advice to the UK football team at their
German training camp: “While you're away from home, I'm sure you will
have lots of temptations of the flesh laid in your way – but for the
sake of England (and your wives), please resist that schnitzel and
don't even think about ‘scoring' with a Bavarian sausage!”

Why is this veggie vixen offering this hot tip to our hot team? The
consumption of meat and other animal products has been linked to heart
disease, strokes, obesity and cancer and clogs the arteries to all the
body's vital organs, not just to the heart. Known as “The Human
Viagra”, Jodie knows that impotence can be a real downer.

“Compared to their meat-eating counterparts, vegetarians are leaner,
feel younger and fitter and perform better and longer at everything.
Besides, at the end of the day, doesn't it really come down to being
able to ‘keepy uppy' – both on and off the pitch?” the humane hottie
writes in her letter.

Most recently seen on our TV screens as one of the housemates in the
hugely successful Celebrity Big Brother, the best-selling
author-turned-campaigner for animals also recently bared all in PETA's
“body parts” ad – in which she sat with a butcher's diagram drawn on
her skin – to bring home the message that animals aren't
“meat-in-the-making” any more than she is; they are intelligent,
feeling individuals who deserve compassion and respect.

Fighting for Factory-Farmed Animals
“I don't eat any animals … I could never eat a dog, and I don't see
how a cow, a sheep, a pig or anything else is any different because
all animals have a mind and a … personality”, says Jodie, who's been a
vegetarian since she was 9.

Factory-farmed animals are made of flesh, blood and bone, just as
humans are. They have the same organs, the same five senses and the
same range of emotions. They have personalities and feelings and form
family relationships and friendships if given the chance. They can
feel fear and pain, and they value their lives.

But they are bred to have their bodies chopped up and packaged.
Condemned to lives in filthy, cramped cages, stalls and sheds, they
are given a steady diet of drugs to keep them alive long enough to be
prodded to the abattoir. Learn more about the cruelty of factory
farming.

Show that you're a fan of animals, too, by following Jodie's advice
and going vegetarian! Order your free copy of PETA's colourful
vegetarian starter kit, packed full of recipes, tips on making the
switch and much more.


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
chico chupacabra
2006-07-18 19:53:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ice
http://www.peta.org.uk/feat/feat-jodiemarsh_worldcup.asp
_Do it for your performance.
These people don't look like they could win the World Cup, you loser:
Loading Image...
Loading Image...
Post by Ice
Do it for your wives.
Their wives won't benefit.
Post by Ice
Do it for England.
Neither will that muddy little island, whose economy benefits from meat sales more than from plant crops.
Post by Ice
Go vegetarian!_ says stunning Jodie Marsh in a sexy letter of support
to our boys competing at the World Cup.
Lot of good it did them, tying Trinidad and Tobago in the opening match.
Post by Ice
Hoping to help their
performances both on and off the pitch, Jodie has sent vegetarian
starter kits along with this advice to the UK football team at their
German training camp: _While you're away from home, I'm sure you will
have lots of temptations of the flesh laid in your way _ but for the
sake of England (and your wives), please resist that schnitzel and
don't even think about _scoring' with a Bavarian sausage!_
The bigger problem for the English lads was all the fucking beer they consumed. The Germans were concerned the Brits would drink them dry. And rightly so!
Post by Ice
Why is this veggie vixen offering this hot tip to our hot team?
Because she's a smarmy authoritarian know-it-none who needs a cause because, just like most other celebs, she's an airhead without much real meaning in her life of illusion. The most vapid people turn to animal rights as their pet cause.
Post by Ice
The consumption of meat and other animal products has been linked to heart
disease,
Wrong. Over-consumption of anything can cause that. So do other factors like smoking, but all I hear veg-authoritarians prattle about is meat; I know vegan smokers -- they bullshit about meat and health but don't give a flying fuck about the dangers they cause themselves in the short term (house fires) and long term (cancer). For fairness' sake, why don't you at least distinguish between lean cuts and fatty cuts if this is really an issue to you? Answer: because your real issue is telling others how to live, not how to live truly healthy lives.
Post by Ice
strokes,
Unproven and wrong; see above.
Post by Ice
obesity and cancer
Unproven and wrong; see above.
Post by Ice
and clogs the arteries to all the
body's vital organs, not just to the heart.
Unproven and wrong; see above.
Post by Ice
Known as _The Human
Viagra_, Jodie knows that impotence can be a real downer.
She might be a slut like that, but that doesn't make her an expert on human health or farming practices.
Post by Ice
_Compared to their meat-eating counterparts, vegetarians are leaner,
No, this generalization is not true. Conscientious, healthful meat eaters can be every bit as lean as vegetarians; vegetarians can be overweight (or in the case of Derek Nash of Eastbourne, obese) and have a variety of maladies including high cholesterol, diabetes, anemia, etc.
Post by Ice
feel younger and fitter and perform better and longer at everything.
Look again at those vegans above. Many of the rest of the pics show them "chilling." They're a bunch of retrograde slackers with a misanthropic agenda. Compare them to meat eaters like Lance Armstrong, who "performed better and longer" more times in one of the most grueling sporting events. And I'm willing to bet there weren't any vegans on the German, Portugese, French, or Italian squads and they outlasted the rest of the teams.
Post by Ice
Besides, at the end of the day, doesn't it really come down to being
able to _keepy uppy' _ both on and off the pitch?_ the humane hottie
writes in her letter.
The little slut is known for her body, not her brain. Why should they've heeded her advice?
Post by Ice
Most recently seen on our TV screens as one of the housemates in the
hugely successful Celebrity Big Brother, the best-selling
author-turned-campaigner for animals also recently bared all in PETA's
_body parts_ ad _ in which she sat with a butcher's diagram drawn on
her skin _ to bring home the message that animals aren't
_meat-in-the-making_ any more than she is; they are intelligent,
More so than she is. Much more so.
Post by Ice
feeling individuals who deserve compassion and respect.
Then say grace before you eat them.
Post by Ice
Fighting for Factory-Farmed Animals
_I don't eat any animals _ I could never eat a dog,
She could if she were Korean.
Post by Ice
and I don't see
how a cow, a sheep, a pig or anything else is any different because
all animals have a mind
She doesn't.
Post by Ice
and a _ personality_,
She doesn't have one, just a smoking body.
Post by Ice
says Jodie, who's been a
vegetarian since she was 9.
Maybe that's why her brain never developed properly? Hahaha.
Post by Ice
Factory-farmed animals are made of flesh,
Meat. It's called meat, you pansy.
Post by Ice
blood and bone, just as humans are.
Yes, but they taste better and it's legal/moral to eat them instead of each other.
Post by Ice
They have the same organs, the same five senses and the
same range of emotions.
Unproven, but she's a hottie and not an academic.
Post by Ice
They have personalities and feelings and form
family relationships and friendships if given the chance. They can
feel fear and pain, and they value their lives.
So does she, but I don't mind.
Post by Ice
But they are bred to have their bodies chopped up and packaged.
Uh huh, and people who eat them find them yummy.
Post by Ice
Condemned to lives in filthy, cramped cages, stalls and sheds,
Not quite. See the happy piggies:
Loading Image...

That's far more typical than the dark images you twats like to portray in your propaganda.
Post by Ice
they are given a steady diet of drugs
Nahh, that's an exaggeration. They're given rounds of antibiotics prophylactically because of the investment tied up in them. What farmer wants to lose an entire herd from a preventable communicable infection when it takes a few quid to eliminate the risk of that?
Post by Ice
to keep them alive long enough
They live anyway; they don't need the drugs to live, they need them the same way kids need immunizations. With minor use of drugs, they live healthily even when other animals around them are unwell.
Post by Ice
to be prodded to the abattoir.
They usually don't need prodding. They usually follow the leader down the steps. Just as you and Jodie have, pansy.
Post by Ice
Learn more about the cruelty of factory farming.
Learn the facts about agriculture and you won't call it factory.
Post by Ice
Show that you're a fan of animals, too, by following Jodie's advice
and going vegetarian!
One can be a "fan of animals" and still eat them.
Ice
2006-07-18 19:19:05 UTC
Permalink
http://www.furisdead.com/feat-beyoncedinner.asp

Beyoncé Gets Served on Fur
We’ve faxed polite letters to her, mailed her videos, and held lively
rallies outside her concerts. We even ran a full-page open letter to
her in Billboard magazine. The only thing that PETA hasn’t tried to do
to reach Beyoncé about the suffering of animals killed for their fur
is to have a frank discussion with her over dinner—until last week. A
recent eBay auction offered fans a chance to have dinner with Beyoncé,
and PETA—unbeknownst to Beyoncé—placed the winning bid, giving us an
unusual opportunity to talk to her directly about the chinchillas who
are electrocuted for their pelts and how other animals are gassed,
strangled, or literally skinned alive before they are made into fur
coats.

When Beyoncé’s car arrived to pick up her “fans,” they were whisked
away to trendy New York City eatery, Nobu 57, where Beyoncé settled
down for dinner and drinks along with her crew, her sister Solange,
and her mother, Tina Knowles (who also happens to be the inspiration
behind Beyoncé’s hideously furry fashion line).

After placing their orders, Beyoncé’s animal-loving dinner companions
pelted her with questions such as “Beyoncé, many of your fans would
like to know why you don’t care about how minks, foxes, and
chinchillas are gassed, strangled, and electrocuted for vanity and if
you might have it in your heart to recognize that fur is not only
cheap and tacky but also horribly cruel?”

Before a stunned Beyoncé could react, the fur foe from PETA pulled out
a portable DVD player and showed her Pamela Anderson’s exposé of the
fur industry—complete with graphic video footage of animals who are
trapped, drowned, and electrocuted for their pelts—and asked,
“Beyoncé, your fans want you to do the right thing for animals who are
skinned alive, beaten, and tortured for their fur, so if you won’t
accept our DVD, will you please log onto FurIsDead.com to see the
video footage that inspired people to write to PETA to help to get you
to stop wearing animal skins?”

Beyoncé didn’t stick around for dessert, but PETA hopes that its
message will stick—and that Destiny’s “Problem” Child will have a
change of heart about fur.

View video footage of Beyoncé’s encounter with PETA.

Please write polite letters encouraging Beyoncé to set a kind example
for her fans by dropping fur from her wardrobe:

Beyonce Knowles
c/o Yvette Noel-Schure
Columbia Records
550 Madison Ave., 26th floor
New York, NY 10022
Ph. 212-833-4483
Fax 212-833-8536

Please sign our pledge to go fur-free.




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 09:56:59 UTC
Permalink
Cheap, quick and brutal
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/farming/intro.htm

Each year in the UK around 900 million animals are raised in factory
farms and killed for food. Modern factory farms exist to produce meat
and dairy products as quickly and cheaply as possible. To keep
production costs down the animals are given the bare minimum they need
to survive.

You might see happy farmyard scenes painted on egg boxes or in TV ads
but the reality is very different. Huge, dark, stinking sheds are
crammed full of sick and miserable animals who will never breathe
fresh air nor see natural daylight. They can hardly stretch their
wings or legs and will never be able to roam or lie down comfortably.

Most farmed animals are slaughtered at just a few weeks or months old.
People like to pretend they are stupid and unfeeling, and that because
they are purpose-bred on a farm it is OK to treat them cruelly and
then kill eat them - yet these animals are sentient creatures who feel
pain, fear, loneliness and boredom, and possess the natural instinct
to survive and protect themselves from harm, just as a domestic cat,
dog, or, indeed, a human being.


Farm animals are not unfeeling 'dumb creatures', but individuals with
character and intelligence. These qualities are ignored when we view
them as creatures whose only reason for living is to be killed for
food.

Which animals are factory farmed?
Pigs
Contrary to popular belief, pigs like to keep themselves clean and are
not happy wallowing in excrement. Yet the vast majority of farmed pigs
often forced to live standing and lying in their own waste. Condemned
to a life of misery and squalor inside the dark and stinking sheds of
factory farms, their need for company, to investigate their
environment, play, root and mother their young are all thwarted.

Approximately 80% of UK breeding sows are housed permanently indoors
and subjected to a never-ending pattern of impregnation and then
having the babies taken away. The sows are put into 'farrowing crates'
- one of the most barbaric tools of the factory farming industry -
about a week before they give birth and are kept there for about a
month after.

Farrowing crates are barren, metal and concrete cages designed to
restrict the sow's movements so that she cannot accidentally crush her
young (The financial cost of losing a piglet being of more concern to
the farmer than the sadness of the death itself, of course!).
Farrowing crates prevent the mothers from stepping forwards or back or
even turning round: for the duration of their restraint, all they can
do is stare at the wall in front of them. Unable to move freely, the
cages can cause the sows physical pain and discomfort; the restriction
- and boredom - also causes severe mental anguish.


Most pigs in Britain are raised in crowded, dank sheds and get to
taste fresh air only briefly while being shunted to and from the
breeding units. 14 million pigs are slaughtered in Britain every year,
with a further 100,000 are exported breeding and killing.

Although the natural weaning process takes 2-3 months, piglets are
usually taken away at 3-4 weeks so that their mothers can be
impregnated again. The growing piglets are raised in concrete pens.
Such barren conditions cause boredom and aggression. Piglets are
routinely subjected to mutilations such as tail-docking and
teeth-clipping to prevent them wounding each other. Bred to grow much
faster than nature intended, piglets are often unable to support their
own weight. Heart and respiratory problems are endemic. A lifetime
spent on hard concrete floors causes breeding sows to suffer a high
incidence of lameness.

Infections run rife on factory farms due to the filth, the heat and
the overcrowded conditions. To keep the animals alive they are given a
cocktail of antibiotics.

After 4 - 7 months, pigs not selected for breeding purposes are sent
for slaughter. Breeding sows are killed at 3 or 4 years old, lame and
unable to stand and exhausted from continuous pregnancies, they are
turned into cheap convenience foods such as sausages and pork pies.

Click here to read the Suffering of Farmed Pigs factfile >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/campaign/vegan/pigs01.htm


Chickens
In the wild, chickens spend their days pecking at the ground for food
and dustbathing. But in modern poultry farms they are crammed by their
thousands into dark sheds, unable to express their natural instincts.


A three-year study of 29 slaughterhouses in the UK revealed that
stunning is often ineffective. 35% of the pigs were found to have been
stunned in the wrong position, and an average of 30 seconds elapsed
between stunning and sticking.

Chickens reared for meat are called 'broilers'. On average, a modern
'broiler' house holds around 45,000 birds but many units have
populations exceeding 100,000. Put into the sheds when tiny chicks, by
the end of their six week growing cycle the unnaturally large birds
are squashed into severely cramped space. To get to the food and water
points, the birds must push their way through a solid mass of other
chickens but many do not make it. The severe over-crowding, coupled
with the fact that the birds are fattened up so quickly that their
legs may not be able to support their own bodies, means millions -
around 6 per cent/approximately 42 million each year - collapse under
the strain and die before they even reach slaughter weight. Their
deaths are inconsequential to the poultry farmers who view the loss as
an expected, and acceptable, part of their industry.

Broiler chickens are vulnerable to a host of health problems including
fatty livers and kidneys, heart attacks, septicaemia, and deformities
caused by arthritis together with the stress of carrying so much
weight on young bones. Because their growth rate is so rapid, their
hearts and lungs struggle to maintain sufficient oxygen levels,
resulting in breathlessness. They are pumped full of drugs to fend off
infection and disease but their short lives are filled with pain and
suffering.

Turkeys aren't only eaten at Christmas - around 30 million are
slaughtered throughout the year in the UK. Many of the same welfare
problems associated with chicken production are found in the turkey
industry. Modern turkeys have been genetically selected for high meat
yields and to fatten in as short a time as possible. They have a
natural life span of approximately 10 years, yet factory farmed
turkeys are slaughtered at between 12 - 26 weeks. In this short period
they may grow to nearly twice the size of their predecessors of only
25 years ago. As with broiler chickens, their legs are frequently
unable to carry the weight of their ballooning bodies and they
collapse and die of thirst and starvation.


Poultry slaughter methods are highly mechanised. Chickens are
suspended upside down by their legs on metal shackles. The most common
method is for a conveyer to take the birds' heads through an
electrically charged water bath, with the current designed to stun
prior to their throats being cut.

Disease is widespread on commercial turkey farms, resulting in
approximately 2.7 million turkeys (or 7% of the total) dying in their
sheds every year. Ulcerated feet and hock burns are common - caused by
the birds having to live their lives standing in urine and
excreta-soaked litter on the barn floors.

In the wild, ducks would spend much of their time paddling and
swimming, yet today they too are factory farmed. Each year in the UK,
more than 20 million ducks are farmed and killed for food. Subjected
to the dark, dirty and cramped conditions typical of all poultry farms
they also have to endure the cruelty of being denied one of their most
basic needs: access to water. Preventing these largely-aquatic birds
from swimming, preening and dipping their heads in water is not only
intrinsically cruel, it also has serious consequences for their
physical well-being. Farmed ducks often exhibit poor feathers and eye
problems - even blindness - from not being able to submerge their
heads in water.

The natural lifespan of a duck is around 15 years yet factory farmed
ducks are slaughtered after 7 weeks.

Even quail - tiny, wild birds - are now crammed into cages and reared
in factory farms.


At the hatchery stage all male chicks are killed (usually by gassing)
because they can neither produce eggs nor put on enough weight quickly
enough to be fattened for meat.
Photo shows chicks being sorted, prior to gassing, Credit: Poultry
World

Egg laying hens
Egg laying hens are a different breed from the chickens kept for meat
production (known as 'broilers'). Most of today's eggs come from
battery farms where 4 or 5 hens are packed into tiny cages barely
bigger than a microwave oven. The government has banned battery cages
from 2012 but the cages they propose to replace them with, called
'enriched cages' are barely any better. Some hens are kept in barns
and although uncaged, the conditions are still filthy and overcrowded.
Millions of 'useless' day-old male chicks are gassed or shredded alive
because they can't lay eggs and, being the 'wrong' type of chicken,
they won't grow fat enough to be eaten.

Debeaking is commonplace on factory farms. The cramped, uncomfortable
living conditions can cause the birds to become frustrated and
stressed, which is borne out in aggressive behaviours such as pecking
and feather-pulling. In order to prevent the birds injuring each other
they have the tips of their beaks sliced off. However, in spite of
this routine mutilation, poultry farms are still full of wounded birds
with big bald patches and gaping holes pecked out of them.

Click here to read our egg factfile >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/farming/shell.htm


Click here to read the Suffering of Farmed Poultry factfile >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/campaign/vegan/poultry01.htm


Just because you see sheep, lambs, cows and calves out in the fields,
doesn't mean that they don't suffer. Although not technically 'factory
farmed' - because they are not confined for the duration of their
lives to a barn or shed - they are still mass-produced and subjected
to a brutal regime which seriously compromises their welfare.


It is estimated that 85% of the total UK egg-laying population of 30
million hens are currently kept in battery cages.

Cows
Naturally, cows do not produce an endless supply of milk. A cow will
feed her calf for approximately six to eight months but, if she does
not become pregnant again, the milk will dry up. To keep the milk
flowing and supply the dairy industry with the millions of litres it
demands, cows are subjected to an endless cycle of pregnancies. The
resulting calves are taken from their mothers at a few days old so the
milk that was meant for them can be bottled up and sold to humans.
Separation of mother and infant causes acute anxiety and suffering to
both animals.

Most dairy calves (without much meat on their bones) are considered a
waste by-product and are killed within a week or two for baby food,
cheap pies, or for the rennet in their stomachs (used in cheese
production). Some join beef herds, others will follow their mothers
and become dairy animals themselves but the majority - in the case of
the male calves in particular - are shot at one or two days old
because they cannot produce milk and are considered 'useless'.

Dairy cows are so over-milked most suffer from mastitis, a painful
infection of the udders. At any one time around 20% of the UK dairy
herd will be lame. Lameness is caused by a number of factors including
inadequate housing, poor husbandry and not least the vast size and
weight of the modern dairy cow's udder. Forced to produce much more
milk than they naturally would, their udders become so large and
distended that most cows simply cannot stand or walk properly.

A cow's natural lifespan should be between 25-30 years. But the
average lifespan of modern dairy cows is about five years. Exhausted,
lame and ailing, they are slaughtered for use in cheap meat products.

Click here to read the Suffering of Farmed Cattle factfile >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/campaign/vegan/cattle01.htm


In modern dairy farming, a cow can be expected to produce between
6,000 and 12,000 litres during her 10 month lactation. This means she
may be carrying in excess of 20 litres at any one time - ten times as
much as would be required for her calf.

Sheep and lambs
Although they are not really 'factory farmed', like pigs, chickens and
dairy cows, just because you see sheep and lambs grazing in the fields
doesn't mean they don't suffer. People see sheep in the driving rain
and snow or in scorching heat and think it's all perfectly natural.
But wild animal do not stand about in fields in fierce weather as
sheep are forced to do, they take cover in burrows, in forests, or in
nests. There is invariably no shelter for sheep. Nor can they rely
upon enough feed, or even sufficient drinking water in the summer
months.

In addition, ewes are forced into producing more lambs at the 'wrong'
time of year. Every year some four million newborn lambs - about one
in five of the total - die within a few days of birth, mostly from
disease, exposure, or malnutrition. Contrary to what the farmers say
(in an attempt to justify the barbarity of fox hunting), fox predation
is not responsible for the loss of so many lambs. Official figures
show foxes take less than 1 per cent - and those they do take are
likely to be already ailing. The high losses are due to exploitation
and neglect by the farmers themselves.

As a result of the burdens put on sheep, they suffer endemic lameness,
miscarriage, infestation and infection. Each year around 1 in 20 sheep
die of cold, starvation, sickness, pregnancy complications or injury
before they can be slaughtered. Often they will die before a farmer
even realises anything is wrong. Lambs who do survive are killed for
food at around 4 months old.

Click here to read our report the Suffering of Farmed Sheep >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/campaign/vegan/sheep01.htm


The UK has the highest sheep population in Europe, with a 1999 flock
size of 44.6 million. Roughly half were breeding animals and the other
half were lambs under one year of age. About 21 million were
slaughtered in 1999.

Fish
It is almost impossible to imagine the number of fish who are killed
each year but it runs into billions. Dragged out of the oceans in huge
fishing nets, their eyes often pop out of their heads due to the
change in pressure and they suffocate as they are crushed amongst
millions of others. Tipped onto the decks of industrial trawlers, they
are frequently gutted alive. Nets the size of football pitches are
indiscriminate in their catch: turtles, dolphins and 'non-target'
species are caught up and killed or tossed, injured and stressed and
therefore likely to perish, back into the water. Large fish such as
tuna are caught on drag lines and may be pulled for miles being ripped
to shreds in the process.

The suffering of fish is now well documented. Scientific reports have
proven that they experience pain and fear and the natural instinct to
survive, just as other animals do. The fact that fish may have led a
'free range' existence does not make their slaughter any more
excusable or their deaths any less brutal and unnecessary.

Industrial fish farms breed fish in huge sunken pens, like battery
cages under water. The fish are unable to swim freely and thrash about
in filthy, stinking water until their time comes to be killed. Disease
runs rife in such cramped conditions and they have to be dosed with
drugs to kill parasites and keep infection at bay. Fish farms wreak
havoc on the environment due to the amount of concentrated effluent
that is discharged into the surrounding waters.

Click here to read The Fish Business >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/campaign/vegan/fish01.htm

Click here to read the Silent Suffering of Lobsters >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/campaign/vegan/lobsters.htm


Most fish are gutted whilst still alive or are left to suffocate. The
whole commerical fishing process, totally ungoverned by humane
protocols, let alone laws, is the greatest animal welfare scandal of
our times.

Free range does not mean cruelty free!
'Free range' is a very misleading term which does not necessarily
guarantee that the animals lived anything resembling a natural or
normal lifestyle with no restraints on their freedom or behaviour. The
conditions free range animals can be kept in are much more confined
than people would imagine, albeit given more room than factory farmed
animals, they can still be reared intensively in small living spaces
with restricted access to the outdoors. The label 'organic' also
implies better welfare standards yet a tiny percentage of the meat
produced in the UK is truly 'organic'. Organically-farmed and 'free
range' animals might have a slightly better quality of life than
factory farmed animals but they will be subjected to the trauma of
transport to the slaughterhouse where they die a terrifying, bloody
death. There is no such thing as a 'free range' or 'organic abattoir'
- the animals are killed in exactly the same way as those who were
reared on a factory farm.

More, more, more!
Animals are now being genetically selected and manipulated to produce
more milk, more meat and more babies. Battery hens lay 20 times more
eggs than they would naturally, dairy cows produce around ten times
more milk than their calves could consume. Research is carried out to
increase their 'productivity' and recently, a sow gave birth to 20
piglets. Farmed animals are regarded as machines whose sole purpose is
to produce food for people to eat, regardless of the consequences to
the animals' own health or welfare. Their grossly obese bodies are
riddled with health problems ranging from deformed legs and feet to
heart problems, eye infections and pneumonia.


By 31 December 2012 farmers must have phased out the use of battery
cages in favour of 'free-range' farming. 'Enriched cages' will have to
give at least 750 sq cm of space per chicken - twice the size of
current cages, but still less than the size of two sheets of A4 paper.

Disease
In recent years a string of diseases have been found in farmed animals
that have threatened both animals and people. There are many theories
as to how and why BSE, which transfers to people in the lethal form of
vCJD, developed but a government-commissioned inquiry found that it
was caused by feeding infected cow and sheep remains to cows (natural
herbivores) and turned into a disaster due to intensive farming
methods. In 2001, millions of farmed animals were killed and burnt to
stop the spread of foot and mouth disease, a highly infectious illness
which affects pig, sheep, cattle and goats. The disease was said to
have originated in a filthy, ramshackle pig farm and spread as animals
were transported to markets and slaughterhouses round the country. The
salmonella virus, a potentially fatal type of food poisoning, is rife
on poultry farms. The more we stress and exploit animals under modern
systems of intensive rearing, the weaker the animals will become and
the more they will fall prey to disease. Farmed animals are fed a
cocktail of drugs and antibiotics to keep them 'healthy', which are in
turn ingested by people eating the meat.

Click here to read Animal Aid's report on BSE >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/campaign/farming/bse.htm


Click here for our Foot & Mouth Disease FAQ >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/fmd/faq/index.htm


Markets
Millions of farmed animals every year spend a punishing day at market
before being sent to slaughter or on to another farm for further
'fattening'. It is an additional and totally unnecessary layer of
suffering for these exploited and abused animals. For many, the hell
of a day at market is merely the prelude to being sent on a punishing
journey as 'live exports' - crammed into lorries and put to sea on a
ferry bound for Europe.

The market is a place of confusion and physical violence. Animals may
arrive at market sick or injured, or sustain injuries during the day.
Frequently, no veterinary attention is received. Animals are beaten on
and off of lorries, through the network of pens and metal 'races' into
and out of the sales rings. The casual brutality of many market users
and employees makes it more difficult for frightened animals to remain
calm.


95% of food poisoning cases are caused by eating animal products.
"The current state of food safety in the UK is such that all raw meat
should be assumed to be contaminated with pathogenic organisms. These
range from campylobacter to salmonella to E.Coli 0157." British
Medical Association, 1998

The market is a place of confusion and physical violence. Animals may
arrive at market sick or injured, or sustain injuries during the day.
Frequently, no veterinary attention is received. Animals are beaten on
and off of lorries, through the network of pens and metal 'races' into
and out of the sales rings. The casual brutality of many market users
and employees makes it more difficult for frightened animals to remain
calm.

It is rare for any of the roughly 14 million animals passing through
English markets every year to have access to water, even on the
hottest days. The same is true of those bartered through the Scottish
and Welsh sales.

Further problems are caused by the fact that the physical fabric of
most markets remains ramshackle and that there is still no accredited
training requirement for those handling the animals. Even children are
witnessed using sticks and electric goads on animals.

In 1993, following the publication of our first undercover report on
livestock markets, Animal Aid established a network of voluntary
market monitors to help combat cruelty and suffering at such sales.
The initiative became known as MarketWatch. Since then, and with vital
help from the monitors, we have produced three further major reports
on markets - each of them supported by undercover footage. The impact
these dossiers have had on the way bartered animals are treated has
been positive and significant. However, despite the improvements of
recent years, not least inspired by Animal Aid's own work, major
problems remain. Animals continue to be subjected to aggressive and
neglectful treatment that often constitutes a breach of the market
welfare laws and/or Code of Practice. Enforcement of animal welfare
legislation remains seriously deficient, with a lack of resources
often blamed. The animals' main lines of defence - the market
operators, vets, local authority trading standards officers and DEFRA
itself - are simply not working as they should.

Click here to read our 2004 report, A Dirty Business >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/markets/dirty.htm

Click here for our markets section with undercover video footage >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/markets/index.htm

There are about 30 major dealers involved in trading animals through
markets and consigning them on live export journeys. They are part of,
and not separate from, the rest of the farming industry. Many farm
themselves. Sheep farmers know who they are dealing with when they put
their animals in the hands of these men.

The life of all farmed animals comes to a brutal, early ending at the
slaughterhouse. Their last few minutes are filled with terror as they
smell the stench of blood and hear the shrieks of other animals being
killed. Although supposed to be 'stunned' first to prevent them
feeling any pain, many animals are not stunned correctly (due to
unsuitable instruments being used but more often because of worker
incompetence and lack of care) and are still alive when they are hung
upside down to have their throats cut. There is also concern that,
even when properly used, the stunning devices (electrical tongs and
captive bolt pistols) do not eliminate the animals' pain. Birds are
dragged through an electrified tank of water to render them
unconscious yet many swan-neck (raise their heads) and miss the water
completely. Slaughtermen are paid on a per animal basis meaning they
rush through as many animals as they can in order to make as much
money as possible - which obviously has implications on the amount of
care they take to ensure each animal is stunned properly.

Go veggie!
If you really care about animals, the best way you can help is to stop
eating them! The average meat-eater consumes around 2,000 animals in
their lifetime. Think of all those lives YOU can save by going veggie!

Make your body a meat-free zone!
Vegetarians don't eat the flesh of any dead animals. We avoid all
forms of meat, fish and slaughterhouse products such as gelatine and
animal fats. Vegans take things one step further and avoid all animal
products including dairy, eggs and honey, and also avoid wearing
animal skins and fibres (e.g. wool and silk).

By going veggie you'll be doing so much good: for the animals, your
health, the planet and for other people too. Here's how:


There has never been a better time for individuals to consider
whether they want to be part of an industry that involves the brutal
deaths of millions of animals every day. As individuals we can all
help to swell the demand for rational food policies by eating only
vegetarian food.

Kick the habit - Meat contains saturated fats which are a main cause
of cancer, heart disease and strokes. Vegetarians are less likely to
suffer from these diseases. You can get all the nutrients you need
from eating a good veggie diet which is naturally low in fat and high
in vitamins and fibre.

Environmentally unfriendly - Intensive animal farming causes terrible
soil erosion and land degradation, methane gas from farmed animals
contributes to global warming and waste from intensive factory farms
is one of the main causes of water pollution. In central America, 90%
of the rainforest has been cleared, primarily for cattle ranching.

Save our seas - Commercial fishing fleets are stripping the oceans
bare, catching dolphins, whales and turtles as well as billions of
fish in nets the size of football pitches. Our oceans are on the point
of environmental collapse and even politicians are expressing concern
at the plummeting levels of some fish. Sea bird populations are being
threatened because there is not enough fish for them to eat.

You stuff, they starve - World hunger is still a terrible problem. Yet
in some countries, crops are grown to feed animals while people in the
same country die of hunger! Rearing animals for food wastes resources
- the same amount of land feeds up to 10 times as many people if you
grow crops on it rather than graze animals.

Click here for the Go Veggie index >>
http://www.animalaid.org.uk/veggie/index.htm

It is estimated that each vegetarian saves around 20 pigs, 29 sheep,
5 cows, 780 chickens, 46 turkeys, 18 ducks, 7 rabbits, 1 goose and
about 1,000 fish in their lifetime.

Top ^



www.animalaid.org.uk | site map | about us |

Animal Aid campaigns peacefully against all animal abuse, and
promotes a cruelty-free lifestyle. You can support our work by
joining, making a donation, or using our online shop. Contact Animal
Aid at The Old Chapel, Bradford Street, Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1AW, UK,
tel +44 (0)1732 364546, fax +44 (0)1732 366533, email
***@animalaid.org.uk




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 10:19:07 UTC
Permalink
95% of food poisoning cases are caused by eating animal products. "The
current state of food safety in the UK is such that all raw meat
should be assumed to be contaminated with pathogenic organisms. These
range from campylobacter to salmonella to E.Coli 0157." British
Medical Association, 1998


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:16:24 UTC
Permalink
Most fish are gutted whilst still alive or are left to suffocate. The
whole commerical fishing process, totally ungoverned by humane
protocols, let alone laws, is the greatest animal welfare scandal of
our times.


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:17:26 UTC
Permalink
The suffering of farmed pigs
Most pigs in Britain are raised in crowded, dank sheds and get to
taste fresh air only briefly while being shunted to and from the
breeding units.

The life of the typical breeding female is particularly harsh and
relentless. They are first impregnated when six to eight months old -
increasingly via artificial insemination. As a result of selective
breeding, sows now typically give birth to 10 or even more piglets,
compared with four or five in the wild.

A week before the end of the 16 and a half week pregnancy, the animals
are moved into a farrowing crate, a barren structure built from metal
and concrete. It is just a few inches longer and wider than the sow
herself. Her newborn piglets are forced to suckle from a small area
known as a "creep", adjacent to but separate from, their mother. The
justification for the use of the farrowing crate is that the sow would
otherwise crush her young. Recent research, however, (Farmers Weekly,
Dec. 31, 1999, p16) shows that, "given the right management", piglets
delivered in loose housing units suffer no more deaths than are found
in farrowing crates.


For more factfiles in this farmed animals series click here.

After three or four weeks, mother and piglets are separated, whereas
under semi-natural conditions, piglets continue suckling for up to
12.5 weeks. The separation - which causes stress to both mother and
offspring - increases the speed with which the sow comes into season
and thus she becomes capable of having another litter sooner than
nature intends. Anorexia is increasingly common amongst young breeding
animals.

Mutilated, fattened and slaughtered
The piglets are moved from the farrowing unit into concrete pens, or
metal cages with perforated concrete or slatted metal floors. These
newly-weaned animals, desperate for their mother's teats, often
frantically try to suckle their young penmates or indulge in tail
biting. The industry's "remedy" is to amputate the lower part of the
tail - a painful mutilation. Many piglets also have their pointed
side-teeth clipped down to the gum in the first few days of life. This
is said to prevent them from lacerating either the sow's udder or the
faces of their litter mates. Once again the industry ignores the real
problem - namely, the piglets are being forced to compete for teats in
an unyielding metal and stone environment with an unnaturally large
number of litter mates.

After about six weeks, the young pigs are moved to similarly
unsuitable rearing pens for final fattening on a high protein diet. An
estimated 15 per cent suffer painful leg and joint problems. This is
caused partly by standing on hard floors, but also because they're
bred to grow unnaturally fast, and are unable to support their own
weight. Heart and respiratory problems are also endemic.

After four to seven months, pigs not selected for breeding purposes
are sent for slaughter. Some die during transit due to stress caused
by overcrowding, long journeys, rough handling, extremes of
temperature.


Pig with growth at livestock market.

From farrowing unit to sausage meat
The mother, meanwhile, following the removal of her piglets, is
returned to a small group pen with other weaned sows - ready to be
re-impregnated within a matter of days. The strain placed upon sows is
visible in health problems that are common in the breeding herd. These
include brittle bones and leg deformities, resulting in lameness,
which in turn leads to an inability to "posture" properly for mating.
This is an important reason for the trend towards artificial
insemination. After three or four years of relentless exploitation,
breeding females - as well as stud boars - are "spent" and ready for
slaughter. They will usually be turned into pie and sausage meat.

Slaughter
Roughly 9 million pigs are slaughtered in British killing plants every
year, and around 30,000 are exported to Europe and further afield for
killing. Around the same figure are also exported for breeding.

Current EU rules allow pigs to travel for 24 hours. Throughout the 24
hours they must have continuous access to water. If the destination
can be reached within another 2 hours then they may go a full 26
hours. After a journey of 24 hours the pigs must be unloaded, given
food and water and rested for 24 hours. Another 24 hour journey can
then be repeated and this pattern can be repeated infinitely.

At the end of March (2004), the European Parliament voted to impose a
9 hour maximum overall journey limit for animals travelling to
slaughter. Before this can become law the measure requires the
approval of the Commission and the Agricultural Council of Ministers.
A final decision has been deferred until 2011.


Pigs do not travel well; a significant number die from heat
exhaustion, heart attacks or suffocation.

While a maximum journey length of 9 hours will be a considerable
improvement on current legislation, it is still a long time to be
spent in a confined space with no room to turn around or lie down.
Pigs do not travel well; a significant number die from heat
exhaustion, heart attacks or suffocation.

In the killing factories, pigs are first "stunned" with electric tongs
applied to the head, the intention being to render them unconscious.
They are then shackled by a back leg and hoisted upside down. Their
throats are cut ("sticking"), severing the main blood vessels in the
neck. Slaughterhouses commonly employ staff on a piecework basis;
their earnings are directly related to the number of animals killed
and cut-up ("dressed"). As a consequence, welfare regulations such as
the need to ensure adequate stunning are frequently flouted.

Incompetence and greed
A three-year study of 29 slaughterhouses in the UK revealed that
stunning is often ineffective. Thirty six per cent of the pigs were
found to have been stunned in the wrong position, and an average of 30
seconds elapsed between stunning and sticking. As a result, 15.6 per
cent of the pigs had to be re-stunned, and 20.5 per cent were found to
have recovered by the time they went to the knife. (Anil and McKinstry
'Summarised Results of a Survey of Pig Abattoirs in England and
Wales', August 1993)

Outside units
It is estimated that around 30 per cent of breeding sows in the UK are
now kept outside. Their offspring, however, will usually be reared in
intensive units. The majority of offspring, however, are still
fattened intensively inside sheds. Equally, outdoor production is
often introduced as a cost saving rather than a welfare measure.
Modern intensive breeds cannot cope with extreme weather conditions -
whether too much rain, snow or sun. They suffer a high incidence of
heat stress, respiratory and other diseases, as well as lameness due
to the often boggy ground.

See also our factfiles on Sheep, Poultry, Cattle, Fish and Lobsters,
then Go Veggie - it's easier than you think.


Choose life, go veggie - see our special vegetarian pages or send for
a FREE go veggie pack now!

Top ^



www.animalaid.org.uk | site map | about us |

Animal Aid campaigns peacefully against all animal abuse, and
promotes a cruelty-free lifestyle. You can support our work by
joining, making a donation, or using our online shop. Contact Animal
Aid at The Old Chapel, Bradford Street, Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1AW, UK,
tel +44 (0)1732 364546, fax +44 (0)1732 366533, email
***@animalaid.org.uk




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:18:35 UTC
Permalink
From Shell to Hell:
the modern egg industry
The modern chicken is descended from the Red Junglefowl (Gallus
gallus) of Asia and has been domesticated for around 8000 years.
During the breeding season, the hens would lay 5-6 eggs in a clutch
before incubating them for 18-20 days (del Hoyo et al, 1994). Compare
this with modern breeds of domestic hen, which lay more than 300 eggs
in a year.

In the wild, hens are active from dawn to dusk, walking, running,
pecking and scratching in the ground for food, dust-bathing and
nest-building. Their natural lifespan is up to ten years. Chickens
farmed for meat are killed when they are six weeks old. Egg laying
hens are killed when around 72 weeks of age.

The modern poultry industry
Meat production
These days, the poultry industry is divided into two areas: egg
production and meat production. Meat - 'broiler' - chickens have been
manipulated, through selective breeding techniques, to make them grow
around twice their natural rate, to get them as fat as possible in as
short a period of time. They grow so big, so fast, their legs are
unable to support their weight and they frequently collapse. Broiler
chickens are slaughtered at six weeks of age - they are still babies,
trapped inside obese, deformed bodies.


'Farm fresh', 'country fresh' and 'fresh from the barn' are all terms
conjured up to disguise the cruelty involved in egg production. You
think eating eggs is a cruelty-free option? Think again.
Photo shows a recently rescued free range hen. Credit: FAWN

Egg production
Egg-laying hens are a different 'type' of chicken to broilers. Bred
specifically for high egg production, they do not put on weight
quickly enough to be considered economically-viable for meat
production. A particularly tragic occurrence springs out of this
difference: the destruction of male chicks, deemed useless because
they cannot lay eggs but are not suitable for meat production either
(see below).

Despite centuries of domestication, laying hens retain the natural
behaviours shown by their wild ancestors. This 'ancestral memory' of
the birds' natural way of life has been carried down the generations
so that hens retain the need to carry out behaviours such as building
a nest, perching, pecking and scratching at the ground, dust-bathing,
etc. (Dawkins, 1993). For the majority of the world's egg-laying hens,
the farming system renders it impossible to live anything remotely
resembling a natural lifestyle.

The global egg industry
Around the world there are approaching 5000 million egg-laying hens.
The latest numbers available show that China had the largest flock
(800 million), followed by the European Union (271 million), the USA
(270 million), Japan (152 million), India (123 million) and Mexico
(103 million) (IEC, 2001).

Globally, between 70-80% of laying hens are housed in battery cages.
The proportion of caged hens in the EU is about 90% (Williams, 2000).

There are about 30 million hens in the UK egg-laying flock. Some 66%
are currently in cages, 27% kept free range; and 7% in perchery/barn
systems (BEIS, 2005).

UK laying hens currently produces around 10,000 million eggs. In the
UK, the average consumer eats 170 eggs per year.


Of the 30 million egg-laying hens in the UK, around 75% are kept in
battery cages. The others are kept in 'alternative' systems such as
'barn' or 'free range'. But look at the photos on this page. Is there
really much difference?

Labelling: what does it really mean?
The egg industry has created a very successful smoke-screen to hide
the harsh reality of modern egg production by using terms such as
'farm fresh' and 'country fresh'. As with 'free range', these
misnomers conjure up images somewhat different from the true picture.
One would not normally describe eggs covered in excrement, lying
amongst the decomposing bodies of dead hens in battery cages as
'fresh'!

From 2004, European Union legislation will make the egg industry more
transparent when it becomes compulsory for eggs to be labelled
according to the method of production. The following terms will apply:

Battery eggs will be labelled "Eggs from caged hens";

Barn eggs will be labelled "Barn" eggs;

Free-range eggs will be labelled "Free Range" eggs.

Farming systems for eggs
Battery Cages
Battery farms consist of huge, windowless sheds housing thousands of
hens who are crammed four or five at a time into small wire cages
stacked on top of each other in rows. The hens are put in to the cages
at around 18 weeks old and will not come out again until they go for
slaughter (around 72 weeks of age).


In battery units, four or five hens are crammed into a space not much
bigger than a microwave oven. They are barely able to move, let alone
stretch their wings.

Battery cages are one of the factory farming industry's most cruel
inventions. Each hen has 450cm² of space - the equivalent of an A4
sheet of paper. The average wing span of a hen is 76cm - the cages are
so small that the hens will never be able to stretch their wings,
raise their heads properly or move freely, and because they are barren
the birds cannot exhibit any of their natural behaviours such as
dust-bathing or building a nest. Free-range birds have been found to
spend half their time freely feeding and foraging (Appleby & Hughes,
1991). Battery hens are denied the ability to do either.

Most intensive egg farms are fully automated - everything from the
lighting to the feeding, watering and egg collection is controlled
automatically. The cage floors slope forward so that eggs roll on to a
conveyor belt and are taken away to be boxed. In order to promote
egg-laying, the sheds are artificially lit for approximately 17 hours
each day, with the lights coming on at around 3am.

Keeping animals in such confined, overcrowded conditions obviously has
serious implications for their welfare and health. Unable to perform
their natural behaviours, the bodies of battery hens degenerate
through lack of exercise. Unable to scratch at the ground, their claws
overgrow and may curl round the wire mesh of the cage.

Hens in traditional battery cages perform 'vacuum' dust-bathing, i.e.
mimic the actions of dust-bathing even though they have no 'dust'.
This behaviour is abnormal and the frustration of hens' normal
dust-bathing behaviour is recognised as a source of suffering (Baxter,
1994).

Hens are frequently cannibalised or crushed to death by their
cage-mates. The decaying corpses of dead birds are not always removed
as farm workers do not see them lying at the back of the cage. The top
and bottom rows of cages, potentially housing thousands of birds, are
particularly difficult to view simply because they are not at eye
level and involve either bending down or standing on something to look
inside. Battery farms are frequently staffed by only a few people. If
enough staff were employed to enable each cage to be inspected each
properly, the battery system would no longer be financially-viable due
to the high cost of staffing.



Battery cages are so inhumane that they will be banned in the EU from
2012. But that means years of suffering ahead, and the replacement -
so-called 'enriched' cages - will make little difference because a
cage is still a cage and the extra space the hens will have is
equivalent to the size of a postcard.

Barn (perchery) systems
Eggs labelled 'barn' are laid by hens who are not caged but are
confined to a shed, often in filthy, stinking cramped conditions. The
birds may be able to stretch their wings - and are therefore probably
slightly better off than battery hens- but they will never see
daylight or breathe fresh air and are still denied real freedom,
comfort or ability to exercise their natural instincts. Flock sizes
can be huge, with some barns housing up to 16,000 birds. The name
'barn' is used to deliberately mislead the public into thinking the
hens are kept in bright, airy conditions with fresh straw on the
floor. Not true!

Free Range Systems
Many people associate the term 'free range' with 'cruelty free' and
assume the hens live a natural lifestyle, merrily pecking at the
ground, willingly giving the farmers the daily gift of an egg.
Unfortunately, this is not the case!

The EU guidelines, to which egg farmers are legally obliged to adhere
(Welfare of Laying Hens Directive), state that in order for eggs to be
labelled 'free range', the hens must have access to an outdoor range
area, accessible through openings in the sides of the barn. The barn
can be stocked at a density of 12 hens per m² (hardly a lot of
space!), and the total opening between the barn and the outside must
not be less than 2m per 1000 hens. Farmers with fewer than 350 birds
in their flock are exempt from the Welfare Directive (unless their
eggs are sold graded as Class A).

The reality is that 'free range' hens are often kept in 'barn'-type
sheds in flocks of up to 16,000. In large-scale free range units,
often fewer than 50% of the birds regularly go outside. Some barns,
for example, only have doors down one side - imagine the scrum trying
to get through the holes to the outside; the hens at the back of the
barn are unlikely ever to be able to pick their way through.

Free range hens are frequently debeaked (see below), and, as with all
commercial laying hens, they are usually slaughtered after one year of
egg production.


Barn hens are still confined to dirty, overcrowded sheds. They will
never see daylight, breathe fresh air or be able to exercise their
natural instincts.
Photo shows barn hens. Credit: Viva!

European Scientific Veterinary Committee Report: an admission of
cruelty
In 1996, the European Union's committee of scientific and veterinary
experts published a report acknowledging the behavioural needs of hens
and the welfare problems caused by caging. The report recognised that:

"Hens have a strong preference for laying their eggs in a nest and are
highly motivated to perform nesting behaviour."

"Hens have a strong preference for a littered floor for pecking,
scratching and dust-bathing."

"Hens have a preference to perch, especially at night."
All of these behaviours are denied to caged hens. The report's
conclusions were:

"Battery cage systems provide a barren environment for the birds... It
is clear that because of its small size and its barrenness, the
battery cage as used at present has inherent severe disadvantages for
the welfare of hens."

1999 Laying Hens Directive
In 1999, the European Union announced that conventional battery cages
would be banned from 2012. The new Laying Hens Directive (Council
Directive 1999/74/EC) also forbids the introduction of newly-built
battery cages from 2003, and requires, until the complete phase-out,
that the space allowance in existing conventional battery cages be
increased from 450 cm² to 550 cm² per bird. Whilst a minor
improvement, to put these space allowances into context, an A4 sheet
of typing paper covers 620 cm².


Many people associate 'free range' with 'cruelty-free' and assume the
hens live a natural life. The reality is very different.
Photo shows free range hens. Credit: FAWN

'Enriched' cages
The proposed replacement for battery cages is the 'enriched cage',
which is slightly bigger and taller than a battery cage and will
contain some 'furniture' such as a shared perch and nest box, plus
litter and a claw-shortening device. However, a cage is still a cage,
despite these changes, and the caged hens will still be denied the
ability to exercise their instincts and fulfil their natural needs.

The actual usable space allotted to each bird in an enriched cage will
be 600 cm² - in effect the increase in space the hens will have is
equivalent to the size of a postcard. Furthermore, consider that the
average hen at rest occupies 600 sq. cm (Dawkins & Nicol, 1989) -
enriched cages, therefore, still only offer the absolute minimum space
required by a hen lying down.

The introduction of enriched cages also has the potential to create
further welfare problems for the hens on top of those already
associated with being kept in such intense captivity. Due to the
severely restricted space they are confined to, the birds are already
in constant contact with each other and the sides of the cage, the
addition of furniture gives them another obstacle to brush up against.
Feather loss is generally worse in cages due to a combination of
abrasion from mesh and feather pecking (Appleby & Hughes, 1991;
Rollin, 1995). Indeed, the provision of furniture actually carries the
disadvantage of increasing the amount of potential abrasive surfaces
and obstacles to free movement in the birds' environment.

Problems such as feeding birds being scratched by the claws of
perching birds and build-up of droppings under perches indicate the
problems of introducing 'enrichment' in a confined space (Walker,
2001).

It is a travesty that one cage system is going to replace another, but
egg producers are desperate to keep their production costs down - to
keep the consumers happy - and caging birds is, unfortunately, the
most economical way of rearing them.


Each year in the UK, approximately 30 million day-old male chicks are
gassed or tossed alive into giant industrial shredders - 'disposed of'
because they are unable to lay eggs and are considered too scrawny a
type of chicken for meat production.

Health problems associated with egg-laying hens
The laying ordeal
Factory-farmed hens lay eggs five or six times a week. The hens become
highly stressed and aggressive during the pre-laying period because of
lack of privacy and nesting materials. When an egg is produced, the
hen's vent becomes distended, red and moist, attracting the attention
of bored and frustrated birds. Vent pecking can occur, and even lead
to cannibalism.

The unnaturally high level of egg production also contributes to
osteoporosis (see below) as calcium is drained from the hens' bodies
for the production of egg shells, often leading to severe osteopenia
(RSPCA, 1989).

Brittle bones
Battery hens suffer Caged Layer Osteoporosis (CLO), or brittle bones.
Research has shown that 35% of premature deaths in cages are due to
CLO, a slow death from paralysis and starvation at the back of the
cage. This is clearly illustrated by the fact that, because of their
ability to move about, non-cage birds may have 41% more tibia strength
than those raised in cages (Meyer & Sunde, quoted in Appleby & Hughes,
1991).

Injured feet
Confined to the cage, the hen is unable to forage by scratching and
pecking at the ground. Denied this simple activity, the hen's claws
can grow long or twisted and be torn off; or even grow around the wire
mesh of the sloping cage floor. The slope itself puts painful pressure
on the hen's toes, causing damage to the bird's feet.


This shocking photo shows chicks being sorted, prior to the males
being gassed.
Credit: Poultry World

Malignant tumours
Another welfare problem associated with pushing hens to lay increasing
numbers eggs is the development of malignant tumours of the oviduct.
In one investigation, a significant proportion of malignant tumours of
the oviduct were identified in 20,000 'spent' layers selected from ten
different farms. The researchers concluded, "... the increase in the
prevalence of the (magnum) tumour coincides with continued selection
of fowl for high egg production" (Anjum, 1989).

Debeaking
As often occurs with all other intensively-farmed animals, the stress
of living in such unnatural, cramped conditions causes hens to behave
aggressively towards one another. Hens frequently exhibit the abnormal
habits of pecking at each other and pulling one another's feathers
out. In extreme cases this can lead to cannibalism. In an attempt to
curtail this behaviour, chicks are routinely subjected to the
mutilation of debeaking.

The industry describes the practice as 'beak trimming' but it is much
more than that. A sharp, hot blade will slice off the end of the
chick's beak. Sometimes a chunk of face may be sliced off too as the
birds are shoved without care into the slicing machine.

Egg producers will maintain that debeaking is no more painful to a
bird than cutting nails is to humans, but scientific evidence proves
that hens not only feel pain at the time of the operation but can also
suffer a lasting, chronic pain.

The slaughter of male chicks
Chick hatcheries breed one or other strain of chick depending on which
industry they supply - egg or meat. Male chicks born of the egg-laying
variety are deemed useless because they cannot lay eggs, but are no
good for meat production either. Each year, approximately 30 million
day old male chicks are 'disposed of'.


Eggs contain saturated fat, one of the main causes of heart disease -
and they are among the highest sources of dietary cholesterol.

At the hatcheries, eggs laid by breeding hens are taken away to
develop inside giant industrial incubators. Once hatched, the newborn
chicks pass down a production line to be sexed and sorted. Sick,
weakly and male 'reject' chicks are pulled out and thrown into giant
sacks or crates. Some are crushed to death or suffocate. The chicks'
next stop is either the gas chamber or the macerator - a giant mincing
machine - into which they are tossed alive.

The slaughter of 'spent' hens
Most egg-laying hens (including free range) are slaughtered at around
72 weeks of age, because, as their egg production drops, they are not
considered profitable enough to keep alive.

The transport and slaughter of hens is an incredibly traumatic
experience. Once caught, the hens are held upside down, several per
hand, and carried out to be packed into crates for transport. Rough
handling and complete disregard for their welfare often leads to them
breaking bones in the process (Turner & Lymbery, 1999). One study
found that at the time of catching and crating, levels of the stress
hormone corticosterone in battery hens were ten times higher than
normal.

On average, 29%, of battery hens arriving at the slaughterhouse are
reported to have at least one freshly-broken bone. Removing the birds
from the crates and hanging them upside down to await slaughter
increases the proportion of hens with broken bones to 45% (Gregory and
Wilkins, 1989; Gregory, 1994).

The slaughter process for hens is the same as for all poultry: they
are shackled upside down, dunked into an electrified waterbath to stun
them, dragged past either a slaughterman with a knife or an automatic
rotating blade to have their throats slit, and then dipped into a
'scalding tank' to loosen their feathers. Birds may 'swan neck' (raise
their heads) causing them to miss the stun bath and may have their
throats cut whilst fully conscious. Some birds may not have their
throats cut properly, meaning they are still alive when they enter the
scalding tank.

'Spent' hens can be worth as little as two pence per bird. Their
carcasses will be used in cheap products such as chicken soups,
pastes, pies, pet food, etc.


Research indicates that eggs can inhibit the absorbtion of iron
(needed for healthy blood, cells and nerves) and contribute to the
loss of calcium (necessary for healthy bones).

The impact of eating eggs on the environment
Farming hens for their eggs is a huge waste of resources. It takes 3
kilos of grain (in the form of chicken feed) to produce one kilo of
eggs. This is because the conversion of crops by farm animals into
food for humans is grossly inefficient. And it is not only food
(grain) that is wasted. Each battery egg takes approximately 180
litres of water to produce. This is a shocking statistic considering
the volumes of water human beings use in developing countries: in
India, for example, the poorest people use an average of only 10
litres of water each per day (O'Brien, 1998).

Studies of farm animal housing have shown that egg farms have one of
the highest farm emission rates of ammonia gas, a serious
environmental pollutant linked to acid rain.

Health hazard!
Eggs - in particular, raw eggs - can be a cause of salmonella food
poisoning.*

In 2003, there were 9,743 laboratory-confirmed cases in the UK of
salmonella enteriditis, a pathogen commonly linked to the consumption
of eggs. Between 1992-2002, of 143 outbreaks of food-borne Infectious
Intestinal Disesease (food poisoning) where eggs were reported as the
vehicle of infection, 124 were caused by salmonella entiriditis. (By
definition an outbreak involves more than one person with an
established link between the cases.) (PHL 06.01.04)

Advice from the Government's Food Standards Agency (FSA) is that
"eating raw eggs may pose a health risk. Vulnerable groups such as the
elderly, the sick, babies and pregnant women should only consume eggs
that have been cooked until the white and yolks are solid" (FSA,
2001).


There are no nutrients in eggs that cannot be obtained from other
foods. Cutting out animal products entirely is the really healthy
option.

* Nowadays, the majority of - but not all - eggs on sale in the UK
bear the Lion Brand stamp of approval which means they have come from
hens who were vaccinated against salmonella. However, the data show
that salmonella clearly has not been eliminated.

Not all they're cracked up to be
Eggs are high in saturated fat and cholesterol - one of the main
causes of heart disease. Eating protein-rich animal products can
actually cause calcium loss: for every 100g of egg consumed, 20mg of
calcium is lost. Eggs also stop our bodies from absorbing
plant-derived iron. There are no nutrients in eggs that you can't get
from elsewhere. In fact, cutting out animal products entirely is the
really healthy option.

With grateful thanks to the following groups who supplied much of the
information for this factfile:

The Vegan Society
Farm Animal Welfare Network
Viva!


For more information - including our new egg leaflet and tasty
egg-free recipes - send for a free Go Veggie Pack today.

Click here for the Go Veggie index >>


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"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:19:55 UTC
Permalink
The suffering of farmed poultry
Europe's Agricultural ministers agreed in June 1999 to end the rearing
of egg-laying chickens in battery cages across the EU - but not until
2012, thereby guaranteeing another decade of unremitting misery for
the battery hen.

The regulation will state that by 31 December 2012 farmers must have
phased out the use of battery cages in favour of "free-range" farming,
the housing of hens in large, barn-like aviaries, or the use of
so-called "enriched cages". The latter will have to give at least 750
sq cm of space per chicken - twice the size of current cages, but
still less than the size of two sheets of A4 paper. In addition, it
will be compulsory to provide a nesting area with litter, a scratching
pad to sharpen claws and a perch.

Welfare optimists are predicting that the high cost of providing
"enhanced" and bigger cages means that they are unlikely to be as
popular with the poultry trade as so called free-range or barn
aviaries. In fact the trade itself is convinced that the current cage
types will eventually be reprieved and demonstrates its confidence by
continuing to feature the contraptions in trade fairs.

Egg producing machines
It is estimated that approximately 66 per cent of the total UK
egg-laying population of 30 million are currently kept in battery
cages. The average yield per hen during 2003 was a staggering 290 eggs
(Defra, Agriculture in the UK 2003).


For more factfiles in this farmed animals series click here.

At the hatchery stage all male chicks are killed (usually by gassing)
because they can neither produce eggs nor put on enough weight quickly
enough to be fattened for meat. Their female counterparts begin their
year-long ordeal in cages at around 18 weeks.

Click here to read Suffer the little chickens >>

Inside the battery houses
Battery cages are stacked in tiers in huge windowless sheds that
accommodate a laying flock of thousands of hens. More than 70% of
birds are kept in flocks of more 20,000. Sheds with in excess of
50,000 hens are fairly common.

A typical cage houses four or five birds and has wire mesh on the
sides and top. The minimum space allowance, as set down in a European
Directive, is the equivalent of less than three-quarters of the
surface area of a standard sheet of A4 paper.

The battery system was designed to allow faeces to drop through the
bottom of the cage, separating the hens from possible sources of
diseases - especially those caused by internal parasites. But the cage
system itself creates severe disease problems and suffering. The
duties of the stockperson amount to little more than the upkeep of
automated equipment and removal of dead birds from their cages. While
no official statistics exist, the government have estimated that over
2 million battery hens die in their cages every year.

Feed and water supplies are automated. Egg-laying apart, eating and
drinking are the only activities available to the birds.

Frustration of natural behaviour
Under natural conditions, hens instinctively display complex
behavioural patterns involving perching, foraging, nesting and
dust-bathing. Close confinement in cages denies the opportunity to
perform any of these activities. Deprivation causes chronic suffering
and social conflict amongst cage mates, including bullying,
feather-pecking and, in extreme cases, cannibalism.

The trauma of laying
Egg laying is a natural physiological function for hens, although not
on anything approaching the scale of the modern commercial bird. And
with no space or cover, the mere act of laying in a battery house
becomes an ordeal in itself. Battery hens are also denied the
opportunity to perform normal pre-laying activity such as nest
building. The stress and frustration which can follow may result in
stereotypical (meaningless and repetitive) behaviour.


Hens begin their year-long ordeal in cages at around 18 weeks.

De-beaking
The egg industry attempts to discourage such aggression by amputating
the upper part of the beak in a routine mutilation known as
"de-beaking" or "beak-trimming". Up to half of the upper and sometimes
also the lower part of the beak is cut away using a red-hot blade.
This causes chronic pain and hampers, yet further, any attempt at
natural behaviour.

No official figures exist for the levels of de-beaking, although.
leading welfare body, the Farm Animal Welfare Network, has estimated
that roughly 15-20% of battery hens are de-beaked, with this figure is
rising due to increasing levels of mortality from cannibalism.

Foot deformities, bone weakness and fractures
Physical consequences of confinement include foot deformities - caused
mainly by the absence of suitable perches - and severe bone weakness -
prompted by restrictions on movement and, thus, normal development.

As a consequence, battery hens are prone to multiple fractures during
capture and transportation to the killing plant. In a study performed
by the Institute of Food Research at Langford near Bristol,
researchers found that 29% of battery hens had broken bones by the
time they reached the slaughterhouse. By the end of the slaughtering
process 98% had broken bones.

Bone weakness is exacerbated by calcium deficiencies caused by heavy
egg-laying programmes. Bone fractures are increased by the emphasis on
speed rather than care amongst the catching gangs who clear end-of-lay
birds from their cages for the journey to the slaughterhouse.

Cancer and genetic selection
The genetic selection of birds on the basis of high egg yields is also
responsible for an increased susceptibility to cancers.


Modern "free range" units usually contain several thousand birds
crammed together in sheds.

Broiler chickens
More than 800 million chickens were slaughtered in the UK during 2003
to provide poultry meat. In 1985 the total was "just" 447 million
birds. This reflects a consumer trend away from red meat to what is
erroneously perceived to be a healthier alternative. (See Look after
your health for problems of salmonella, campylobacter etc.)

The broiler house
Chicks are artificially hatched and then housed in huge, windowless
sheds for the duration of their six-week growing period. On average, a
modern "broiler" house holds around 45,000 birds, usually kept on a
litter bed of wood shavings or chopped straw. But many units have
populations exceeding 100,000.

As birds grow, space for each individual decreases. By the end of the
growing cycle each bird has only 0.5 square ft of floor and must push
his/her way through a solid mass of other chickens to reach food and
water points. Many die in the attempt. The government has estimated
that about 6% (or more than 42 million birds annually) die before the
end of each growing cycle.

Millions of monster babies
The life span of an unconfined chicken can be up to 10 years, yet
table fowls or broilers are usually slaughtered at six weeks of age,
before they reach sexual maturity. They reach adult size so quickly
because of a combination of the following: ruthless genetic selection,
the use of a high protein diet and the routine inclusion of antibiotic
growth promoters in feed. The latter are being phased out because of
human health concerns, under orders from Brussels. But the trade is
turning to other chemicals to produce the same unnatural effect.

Crippled during infancy
The combination of accelerated growth rates and unhealthy living
conditions account for the huge number of birds who die prematurely.
Broiler chickens are vulnerable to fatty livers and kidneys, heart
attacks, septicaemia, and deformities caused by arthritis together
with the stress of carrying so much weight on young bones.


A rescued "free range" hen.
Photo credit: FAWN

Many broiler chickens also die from ascites: their growth rate is so
rapid that their heart, lungs and circulatory system struggle to
maintain sufficient oxygen levels. This results in breathlessness and
distended abdomens caused by a build up of yellow or blood-stained
fluid.

Visible indicators of suffering
Broiler houses are not cleaned during the growing cycle, which results
in the accumulation of faeces in the litter. This can often lead to
blistering, ulcerated feet and hock burns. The latter are caused by
exposure of the skin to high levels of ammonia. It is not uncommon to
find visible hock burns on chicken carcases sold in supermarkets.

Broiler breeders
Breeding birds are the poultry selected to produce progeny who are
then fattened for the table. Unlike their offspring, these breeders
are not required to grow quickly: on the contrary, the emphasis is on
reducing their growth. To achieve this, they are fed a restricted
diet. A survey indicates that broiler breeders are permitted to eat
only a quarter of the amount they would consume if food were freely
available. (C. J. Savory, K.Maros and S.M. Rutter, Animal Welfare,
2:131-132, 1993). The conclusion is that birds are "chronically
hungry, frustrated and stressed".

Turkeys
Turkeys aren't just for Christmas anymore - more than 20 million are
killed and eaten throughout the year in the UK.

Intensive production
The majority of turkey production is intensive, with up to 25,000
birds kept in large windowless buildings similar to broiler chicken
houses.


The suffering of the birds is apparent to the naked eye.

Consequences of intensification
Many of the same welfare problems associated with broiler chicken
production are found in the turkey industry. Turkeys have been
genetically selected for high meat yields and to fatten in as short a
time as possible. They have a natural life span of approximately 10
years, yet they are slaughtered at between 12 - 26 weeks.

In this short period they may grow to nearly twice the size of their
predecessors of only 25 years ago. As a consequence, their legs become
unable to support the huge weight of their breast muscle or to sustain
normal posture and limb movement.

Early mortality - 2.7 million annually
Unhealthy and overcrowded conditions mean that disease amongst
commercial turkeys is widespread, resulting in approximately 2.7
million turkeys (or 7% of the total) dying in their sheds every year.
Foot and leg deformities, heat stress and starvation caused by the
inability of immature birds to find the feed and water troughs are
commonplace. Ulcerated feet and hock burns are common - caused by
continual contact with litter contaminated by urine and faeces.

Artificial insemination now the norm
The accelerated growth of modern turkeys mean that the males (stags)
are now too broad-breasted and heavy (weighing as much as 60lbs) to
reproduce naturally. Instead, artificial insemination (AI) is applied,
whereby the birds are masturbated by hand and their semen inserted
into the females via tubes and catheters. Government literature gives
detailed instructions on the correct way to masturbate, or "milk"
males.

Aggression and de-beaking
90% of turkeys are kept in near-darkness to discourage the aggression
which becomes a problem when so many birds are crammed into a confined
space. Debeaking of the sort used on battery hens is also commonly
carried out in the first week of the birds' short lives. Research
suggests that turkeys suffer chronic pain for 2-6 weeks after
de-beaking.


Turkeys are kept in near-darkness to discourage the aggression which
becomes a problem when so many birds are crammed into a confined
space.

Loading and transportation of poultry
Battery hens, broiler chickens and turkeys endure the same fate at the
end of their productive lives. All are subjected to the ordeal of
catching, transportation and slaughter. Only the further processing is
different: broilers become oven-ready birds for the table, whilst
end-of-lay battery hens are made into lower grade poultry products
such as pies, soups, chicken stock and baby foods.

The birds are typically grabbed by the feet and thrust into crates, or
"modules", before being loaded onto lorries. Many suffer additional
injuries at this time and hundreds of chickens can die from a
panic-induced crush each time the catching gang enters the shed.

Others die during the journey to the killing plants, often from heart
attacks. Injuries and wounds account for the other fatalities. The
most common injury is dislocation of the femur (the bone between the
hip and the knee). This is almost certainly the result of rough
handling by catching teams.

Slaughter
Poultry slaughter methods are highly mechanised and designed to
maximise speed rather than to minimise suffering. Chickens are removed
from their crates/modules and suspended upside down by their legs on
metal shackles. The most common method is for a conveyer to take the
birds' heads through an electrically charged water bath, with the
current designed to stun and leave them insensible to pain when their
throats are cut.

They are killed by severing the main blood vessels in the neck. This
is usually done with an automatic knife, with a slaughterman employed
as a back-up to slit the throat manually of any birds missed by the
machine. Once dead, the birds are immersed in a scalding tank to
loosen the feathers before plucking.


Chicks being sorted - male chicks are gassed.
Photo credit: Poultry World

Killed whilst fully conscious
There is considerable evidence that the slaughter process is
inefficient. Inadequate stunning results in some birds going to the
knife and even to the scalding tank alive and possibly fully
conscious. Turkey slaughter has been extensively investigated by
researchers at the Agricultural and Food Research Council (AFRC),
Institute of Food Research, Langford, Bristol. Twenty six per cent of
turkeys included in their survey received painful pre-stun shocks
(i.e. accidental electric shocks) when birds' wings touched the
electrically charged waterbath before their heads did, or when the
ramp leading to the bath became electrically live. Worst of all,
studies indicated that nationally, every year, around 35,000 turkeys
may be entering the scalding tank alive and perhaps conscious.

Deliberate cruelty
Evidence produced in court hearings indicate that deliberate cruelty
is sometimes inflicted upon poultry in British slaughterhouses. For
example, a 1993 industrial tribunal heard the case of a former
employee at a poultry processing plant in Winchester in which
'bagpiping' was described. Slaughterhouse staff squeezed live birds in
a game that involved squirting faeces over other employees.

Elsewhere, poultry catchers have told how some of their colleagues
kicked, punched, tied up and force-fed chickens and turkeys to relieve
the boredom and frustration of their work. (Here's the Catch, Animal
Aid 1994.)

'Free range' birds
The term "free range" suggests a handful of chickens or turkeys
scratching around a yard. But modern free range units usually contain
several thousand selectively-bred birds crammed together in each shed.
Pop holes allow the inhabitants to exit and re-enter when the weather
is suitable. But because of the special stresses associated with a
system that pretends to be what it isn't (the constantly shifting
struggle amongst the birds for territory; their movement from heated
interior to the bug-laden outside world and back again), the
genetically enfeebled birds typically suffer high early mortality
rates.

For further reading see From Shell to Hell. See also our factfiles on
Sheep, Pigs, Cattle, Fish and Lobsters then Go Veggie - it's easier
than you think.


Choose life, go veggie - see our special vegetarian pages or send for
a FREE go veggie pack now!

Top ^



www.animalaid.org.uk | site map | about us |

Animal Aid campaigns peacefully against all animal abuse, and
promotes a cruelty-free lifestyle. You can support our work by
joining, making a donation, or using our online shop. Contact Animal
Aid at The Old Chapel, Bradford Street, Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1AW, UK,
tel +44 (0)1732 364546, fax +44 (0)1732 366533, email
***@animalaid.org.uk




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:20:32 UTC
Permalink
The suffering of farmed cattle
The size of the total cattle herd in the UK - including both dairy and
beef animals - was about was about 10.4 million in 2003. Of these, 2.2
million were adult dairy cows.

In order to produce commercial quantities of milk, dairy cows are
forced to endure a constant cycle of pregnancies. Lactation does not
occur unless this cycle is perpetuated. Calves are usually removed
from their mothers within 24 hours of birth, after suckling their
mother's first antibody-rich milk, known as colostrum. Separation of
mother and infant causes acute anxiety and suffering for both animals.

Before the BSE crisis, half a million baby calves were transported on
marathon journeys to continental European veal crates - a trade the
dairy industry is keen to resume. In more recent times, the youngsters
were killed and destroyed under the "calf processing scheme" and a
subsidy paid to the producer. The CPS is now defunct but because there
remains a reduced demand for British beef most dairy calves (without
much meat on their bones) are considered a waste by-product and are
killed within a week or two for baby food, or for cheese and pie
ingredients. Other offspring join beef herds, will follow their
mothers and become dairy animals themselves - or are reported to be
shot and buried in the vicinity of the farm.


For more factfiles in this farmed animals series click here.

Milk-producing machines
Dairy cows in the UK are typically black and white Holstein/Friesians,
genetically selected to provide maximum milk yields. In an unfettered
state, a cow will feed her calf for approximately six to eight months.
Milk is secreted at a maximum rate of about eight to ten litres per
day, which the calf suckles on four to six occasions. The mother
produces less than 1,000 litres throughout the duration of her
lactation, storing approximately two litres in her udders at any one
time.

In modern dairy farming, cows can be expected to produce between 6,000
and 12,000 litres during their 10 month lactation. This means she may
be carrying in excess of 20 litres at any one time - ten times as much
as would be required for her calf. (Webster Animal Welfare - A Cool
Eye Towards Eden 1995 p169 - 170).

The average lifespan of modern dairy cows is only about five years.
Naturally, they live to an age of 25-30 years.

Exploitation of the reproductive system
The most common technique used to impregnate dairy cows is artificial
insemination (AI). But, increasingly, powerful hormones are being used
to force high quality cows to produce large numbers of embryos, which
are surgically removed and inserted into lower grade females who then
bring the calves to term.

Housing
Dairy cows are usually kept outside on pasture for the duration of the
summer months. For the remainder of the year they are kept indoors,
typically in concrete cubicle houses. Each cow has a cubicle to stand
or lie in, which should have straw or wood shavings provided. Behind
each animal a passageway collects urine and faeces, requiring cleaning
twice daily. Accumulated waste is stored in huge slurry lagoons, later
to be spread on the land.


Cow with leaking, infected udder at livestock market.

Many cubicles still in use were designed decades ago and have become
too small for the modern, larger animal. This has compounded welfare
problems, resulting in cows standing in the dunging passageway. It
also has major health implications.

Lameness
Around 20% of British dairy cows are lame at any one time. In fact,
inspections of the feet of cull cows at slaughter reveal evidence of
past or present foot damage in nearly all animals. Lameness is caused
by a number of factors. These include the quantity of bedding
available, the move towards cubicle housing and the now near universal
practice of feeding animals wet, fermented grass (known as silage),
rather than dry hay. Silage produces wet faeces and acidic slurry in
the dunging passageway, which eventually softens the feet and causes
infection.

Also implicated in lameness is the reliance on concentrated feed
supplements, which are difficult for these slow-digesting ruminants to
cope with. The result is the release of inflammatory substances into
the bloodstream, which lead to a condition known as laminitis, an
acutely painful foot disorder.

Another important reason for dairy cow lameness is the vast size and
weight of the modern animal's udder. It is so large and distended that
most cows simply cannot stand or walk properly.

Mastitis
Dairy cows are prone to infection of the udder caused by bacteria and
other environmental pathogens entering via the teat canal. This
acutely painful condition is known as mastitis. Incidence varies from
between 30 to more than 60 cases in every 100 cows during a year.

Milk fever and other diseases
About 5%-8% of cows suffer from the condition known as "milk fever".
This is caused by the sudden depletion of calcium reserves each year
from the heavy burden of calf-birth and lactation.


The slaughterhouse - a "frightening picture of poor hygiene, slapdash
organisation and blood and gore all over the floor".

Many also get "grass staggers" from lack of magnesium in the diet.
General depletion of nutrients caused by increasing intensification
also triggers cases of brucellosis and viral infections and
susceptibility to salmonella bacteria.

Most cows are spent by the age of four or five - though a great many
are played out younger than that due to the increasing incidence of
stress-related infertility and lameness. Because of the BSE crisis, no
cattle older than 30 months are permitted to go into the human food
chain. Instead, they are killed and burned and their remains stored in
giant warehouses around the country.

Beef cattle
There were nearly 1.7 million adult beef cows in the UK in 2003. As
well as suckling their own calves, around 70% of youngsters born to
dairy animals are also raised within beef herds. From the beef
farmer's point of view, the heavier and "beefier" his calves the
better. Specialist companies dealing in bull semen for artificial
insemination (AI) provide the means to achieve this.

The most popular breed chosen to provide semen is the Belgian Blue.
This animal carries a recessive gene for "double muscling", so-called
because of the enormous muscles, particularly on the hindquarters.
Belgian Blue stud bulls have to be born via Caesarean section because
their sheer size makes natural delivery impossible.

Mutilations performed on cattle
Male calves reared for beef are often castrated, despite being
slaughtered before they reach sexual maturity. Methods commonly used
include surgical castration, tight rubber rings that restrict blood
flow, and appliances that crush the spermatic cord of each testis -
the so-called "bloodless castrator".

Both dairy cows and beef cattle are de-horned - a painful procedure -
to prevent animals injuring each other. Horns contain both blood
circulation and nerve endings, and so local anaesthesia and
cauterisation are necessary to stem bleeding. If horns have already
developed, they are removed with saws, horn shears or cutting wire.


Dead cows being disposed of during the foot and mouth crisis.

Young animals whose horns are not established can be disbudded. A hot
iron is applied to the horn-forming tissue when the calf is 4-6 weeks
old, permanently preventing growth.

E. coli and filthy abattoirs
The BSE crisis was followed in the winter of 1996/97 by a serious
outbreak of food poisoning created by meat infected with E. coli 0157
bacteria. Twenty people died in a series of outbreaks in Scotland.
(See also Look after your health.)

E. coli 0157 is a relatively new organism, first identified in 1982,
and is an example of how the routine use of antibiotics in meat
production is developing increasingly dangerous pathogens that are
resistant to conventional drug treatment.

Publication of a report compiled by seven inspectors for the Meat
Hygiene Service in March 1997 (it was actually completed in December
1995, but suppressed by government) has shown how potentially fatal
organisms such as E coli enter slaughterhouses on the skins of
infected animals and how procedures within abattoirs are likely to
result in pathogens spreading to other animals and eventually to the
consumer.

The Report showed that workers on cattle slaughter lines often used
"dirty knives", and the same hands to touch both hides and meat
without washing. It criticised "poor access to sinks and sterilisers".

Worse criticism was reserved for the system used for cutting up
carcasses: "The action of plant staff, when contamination occurs is
often incorrect. Major faecal contamination on the carcass, due to
poor dressing practices, is a serious cause for concern."

This condemnation of British abattoirs is one in a long line of
reports. In 1986, EEC inspectors found a "frightening picture of poor
hygiene, slapdash organisation and blood and gore all over the floor",
whilst at the beginning of the '90s, nine out of ten of the nation's
900 slaughterhouses fell below the standard set down by EU inspectors.


Cow in very poor condition at livestock market.

Subsidies
Of cattle farmers' total income of £2088 million in 2003, £928 million
came by way of subsidies from the taxpayer.

Live transport
Current EU rules allow cattle to travel for 14 hours without a rest or
water. They must have a rest period of at least one hour after a 14
hour journey, after which, they may be transported for a further 14
hours. If the destination can be reached within another 2 hours then
they may go a full 16 hours. After the second 14 hour journey, if the
destination has not been reached the cattle must be unloaded, given
food and water and rested for 24 hours. The journey times can then be
repeated and this pattern can be repeated infinitely.

At the end of March (2004), the European Parliament voted to impose a
9 hour maximum overall journey limit for animals travelling to
slaughter. Before this can become law the measure requires the
approval of the Commission and the Agricultural Council of Ministers.
A final decision has been deferred until 2011.

While a maximum journey length of 9 hours will be a considerable
improvement on current legislation, it is still a long time to be
spent in a confined space with no room to turn around, lie down and
without access to water.

See also our factfiles on Sheep, Poultry, Pigs, Fish and Lobsters.
then Go Veggie - it's easier than you think.


Choose life, go veggie - see our special vegetarian pages or send for
a FREE go veggie pack now!

Top ^



www.animalaid.org.uk | site map | about us |

Animal Aid campaigns peacefully against all animal abuse, and
promotes a cruelty-free lifestyle. You can support our work by
joining, making a donation, or using our online shop. Contact Animal
Aid at The Old Chapel, Bradford Street, Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1AW, UK,
tel +44 (0)1732 364546, fax +44 (0)1732 366533, email
***@animalaid.org.uk




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:21:16 UTC
Permalink
The suffering of farmed sheep
The following statement from a Ruthin, Denbighshire vet, M.W. Allen,
quoted in The Times January 6, 2000, speaks volumes about the modern
British sheep industry (the 'small furry creature' referred to at the
end of the impassioned statement is the fox).

"There are few more pitiful sights on a night call into the hills in
January than a small lamb caught in the headlights, hunched up against
sleet in a field with no shelter in sight. I find it perverse that,
when every year millions of lamb deaths are due to the mind boggling
absurdity of lambing in the worst time of year (December to February),
to poor hygiene and overstocking in sheds, and to ewes not producing
enough good-quality colostrum because they are in poor condition, so
much vitriol should be expended in the direction of this small furry
creature [the fox]."

Lamb deaths: the shepherd not the fox
In other words, fox predation is not responsible for the loss of so
many lambs. Official figures show foxes take less than 1 per cent -
and those they do take are likely to be already ailing. The high
losses are due to exploitation and neglect by farmers themselves.


For more factfiles in this farmed animals series click here.

Some four million newborn lambs - about one in five of the total - die
every year within a few days of birth, mostly from disease, exposure,
or malnutrition. (Henderson, Lamb Survival, Farming Press). And about
a million adult breeding animals (out of about 17.5 million) also die
in the fields annually.

Victims of fierce weather
Farmers often talk contemptuously of sheep looking for any old excuse
to drop down dead. In fact sheep are forced to endure floods, storms,
blizzards and drought. In addition, they are pressed into producing
more lambs at the "wrong" time of year. As a result of these burdens,
they suffer endemic lameness, miscarriage, infestation and viral and
bacterial infection. Often they will die before a farmer will know
that something is wrong.

People see sheep in the driving rain and snow or in scorching heat and
think it's all perfectly natural. But wild animal do not stand about
in fields in fierce weather - as sheep are forced to do. Wild animals
take cover in burrows, in forests, or in nests. There is invariably no
shelter for sheep. Nor can they rely upon enough feed, or even
sufficient drinking water in the summer months.

Size of the industry
The UK has the highest sheep population in Europe, with a 2003 flock
size of 35.7 million. Roughly half were breeding animals and the other
half were lambs under one year of age. About 15.8 million were
slaughtered in 2003. (Defra, Agriculture In The UK 2003).

Like other branches of livestock farming, the sheep industry has been
sucked into a self-defeating spiral in which more traditional farming
methods have been abandoned for the short term allure of
intensification. This trend has been fuelled by massive public
subsidies and compensation packages. About 30% of the sheep farmers'
total income of £1007 million is from the taxpayer.


Dirty lambs, produced at the 'wrong' time of year and kept in fields
without shelter.

More sheep, fewer shepherds
But while the number of sheep has increased, the number of trained
shepherds has not. Among the results is a high incidence of serious
foot problems and dirty wool around the tails - the last of which can
lead to devastating infestations.

More pregnancies and multiple births
Under natural conditions sheep will reproduce every spring after a
five month pregnancy. Ewes are physiologically designed to produce a
single lamb with each gestation (twins would naturally be relatively
rare). But genetic selection and intensive feeding have created a
situation whereby twins and even triplets are commonplace.

Lambing time has also been manipulated. Instead of taking place in
spring, between 10% and 15% of the annual lamb 'crop' is now produced
between December and the end of February (Government Parliamentary
Question 04.07.95). The aim is to get the lambs to market ahead of
competition. Within days of their birth, many of the surviving
youngsters are turned out to face the winter weather.

Drugs are used to bring the ewes into season as much as six weeks
early and to ensure that a flock (or a proportion of it) ovulates all
at once. The latter is for the convenience of the farm workers, not
the ewes.

Ewes are 'serviced' by a ram or, increasingly, subjected to artificial
insemination (AI). AI is an especially invasive procedure for ewes.
One development in AI requires surgical intervention. The ewe is
up-ended on a rack and the semen inserted directly into her womb.
Embryo transfer takes interference in the reproductive process one
stage further. Fertilised embryos are 'flushed' out of a 'quality'
donor animal and inserted into a lower-value 'recipient'.


"The health of the British sheep flock is declining" - sheep with
growth at market.

To obtain semen for AI, or to sample a ram's breeding potential, the
farmer masturbates the animal by hand. Alternatively, an electric
probe is inserted into the ram's anus and directed downwards so that
it bears upon his prostate gland. A button is pushed and an electric
shock administered to make the ram ejaculate. "I have often seen the
ram off his feet and writhing in agony having had this done," a North
Wales veterinary assistant told Animal Aid. (Silence of the Lambs,
Animal Aid, 1995.)

Routine mutilations - castration and 'tail-docking'
Shortly after birth, lambs are subjected to two painful mutilations:
castration and tail-docking. Males are castrated in order to prevent
unplanned breeding (even though many lambs are slaughtered before they
reach sexual maturity), and to reduce aggression. It is also believed
that castration ensures quicker growth and better carcass quality. The
castration technique most commonly used is to restrict blood supply to
the testicles through the use of a tight rubber ring, causing them to
wither and drop off within a few weeks.

The same method is used with tail docking. A rubber ring is fitted,
designed to restrict the blood supply to the lower half of the tail.
Farmers perform this mutilation to prevent "fly-strike" or "blow fly",
an infestation which occurs in faeces that gathers around the tail.
This problem has increased with the higher ratio of sheep to
shepherds.

Unless carried out with caution, these mutilations - castration
especially - can lead to serious, even fatal injuries. And if
performed too soon after birth, the distress suffered by the lambs may
be so great that they stop suckling for a few hours. This contributes
to high rates of early mortality.

Diseases
"The health of the British sheep flock is declining... This is true
for diseases caused by viruses, bacteria and ecto(skin)parasites." (Dr
Gerald Coles, senior research fellow in veterinary medicine, Bristol
University, The Sheep Farmer, March 1995.)


Lambs at market - despite the regulations, lambs as young as two or
three days old are frequently seen in livestock markets.

A range of "preventive" drugs for a wide range of external and
internal parasites are either injected, poured down the throat, or
applied through whole-body immersion of the entire flock.

The government's official agricultural advisory body, the Farm Animal
Welfare Council, has said it is concerned that "there are many cases
of incorrect and inappropriate treatments" (Farm Animal Welfare
Council Report on the Welfare of Sheep, April 1994) of what are often
powerful and toxic compounds. Needles and syringes are rarely cleaned
or replaced, even after use on dozens or perhaps hundreds of animals.
This leads to abscesses and other complications.

A percentage of animals also fall prey to viral diseases, scrapie,
mastitis, rotting teeth, fallen womb (prolapse), lameness and
blindness.

Sheep dipping is directed against two devastating conditions known as
scab and blowflies. The latter more easily takes root when animals get
soaked to the skin and mud caked. It can result in maggots eating the
sheep alive. Until July 1992, dipping to combat this condition was
compulsory. It was undertaken with a solution containing
organophosphate pesticides (OPs). Following widespread reports of
farmers suffering serious dipping-related illnesses, the Ministry of
Agriculture now require that anyone using OPs must first obtain a
certificate of competence.

The negative impact of dipping on sheep themselves is rarely
discussed, even though the animals are totally immersed in the toxic
solution with their heads held under with a broom or crook. An October
1994 article in The Sheep Farmer listed the "uncontrolled nervous
signs" that can result from accidental ingestion or the use of the
wrong concentration. These included "excessive salivation and tears,
frequent urination, vomiting, difficulty in breathing, muscle
twitching developing to incoordination, paralysis, collapse and
death". Dipping is also associated with an increased risk of bacterial
infection.

British sheep, additionally, harbour various "slow virus" diseases
(conditions with a long incubation period without symptoms). One of
these is scrapie, believed by Government scientists to be one of the
likely sources of BSE in cattle - the latter having been fed infected
sheep meat.


Dead sheep at the height of the 2001 foot and mouth disaster.
Photo credit: Charlie Hedley / North News & Pictures

In 2001, more than 6 million farmed animals were killed and burnt or
buried to stop the spread of foot and mouth disease, a highly
infectious illness that affects sheep, pigs, cattle and goats. The
disease was said to have originated on a filthy pig farm. It very
quickly spread as animals were transported to markets and
slaughterhouses round the country. At the time of the epidemic,
livestock markets were suspended for fear of spreading the disease
further. These markets have since been re-opened. However, basic
biosecurity rules are not being adhered to, which means the risk of
another disease epidemic is current and substantial. See Animal Aid's
report, A Dirty Business (published May 2004).

Forced adoption
Around 10% of all lambs born in the lowlands (where most of the high
tech manipulation of sheep flocks takes place) are from triplet
births. Because ewes have just two teats, the "spare" triplet must
quickly be found a lactating ewe with an unused teat. If the selected
adult doesn't readily accept the young interloper - frequently the
case - she will be tethered by a rope, or held by the neck inside what
is called an adopter box. These look rather like medieval stocks and
allow the orphan free access to the adult's milk. The ewe may remain
in this contraption for four or five days.

An alternative is to feed the "spare" by a tube, which is threaded
into his or her stomach via the mouth. Some lambs - already distraught
at being separated from their mothers - are killed or injured during
this process.

Another method is for the shepherd to insert his hand deep into the
ewe's vagina and manually "palpitate" it and the cervix for two
minutes - thereby persuading the ewe that she has given birth to
another lamb. Where a ewe has lost her own lamb, she might be
persuaded to take on a "spare" by this method, particularly if that
spare is cloaked in the skin of her dead new-born.

Shearing
Shearing can be stressful and is often carried out with little regard
for welfare. For instance, recently shorn animals may be exposed to
hot sun at markets without shelter. Shearing of pregnant ewes in the
winter is sometimes done to enable more of them to be crowded into
housing and may leave them suffering from cold. In December 1999, a
National Sheep Association spokesman told The Times (Dec. 8) that
winter shearing "is the future of sheep farming. The fact that you
take their coats off means they have to eat more to keep warm. You end
up with a better meat-to-bone-and-fat ratio."


More than 6 million farmed animals were killed in an attempt to stop
the spread of foot and mouth disease.
Photo credit: Charlie Hedley / North News & Pictures

The idea is that winter-shorn sheep will head for a barn where they'll
huddle together and put on body fat. But with muck and urine gathering
under foot, they also face, within the sheds, an increased risk of
picking up and passing on disease, such as foot rot. But, of course,
there won't always be a barn within reach.

The stresses of livestock markets
80% of UK-produced sheep pass through domestic livestock markets prior
to slaughter, further fattening, or export. Harsh treatment and hours
standing in crowded pens on hard stone floors is the norm during the
bartering process. The Welfare of Animals at Markets (Amendment) Order
1993 prohibits the sale of lambs (or goat kids) with unhealed navels.
Even so, navels are usually already healed within seven days, and
sometimes as quickly as 48 hours. Also, spray products can be
purchased to dry out navels rapidly. Hence, lambs as young as two or
three days old are frequently seen in markets. Often, they will be
with their mothers and sold as a "job lot". But many very young
orphans are also bartered and sold for a few pounds. Lambs may be sent
for slaughter between the ages of 3 and 10 months.

Live exports of sheep
Although the live export of sheep has dropped from the massive 1993
levels of 1.9 million, around 68,000 were exported in 2003. As has
been well documented, sheep endure horrific suffering on long journeys
from UK ports to continental destinations.


Lamb in lorry - current EU rules allow sheep to travel for 14 hours
without a rest or water.

Current EU rules allow sheep to travel for 14 hours without a rest or
water. They must have a rest period of one hour after a 14 hour
journey, after which, they may be transported for a further 14 hours.
By the time the animals have been unloaded and loaded within an hour,
which causes a lot of stress, they will not have a full hours rest off
the vehicle. If the destination can be reached within another 2 hours
then they may go a full 16 hours. After the second 14 hour journey, if
the destination has not been reached, the sheep must be unloaded,
given food and water and rested for 24 hours. The journey times can
then be repeated and this pattern can be repeated infinitely.

At the end of March (2004), the European Parliament voted to impose a
9 hour maximum overall journey limit for animals travelling to
slaughter. Before this can become law the measure requires the
approval of the Commission and the Agricultural Council of Ministers.
A final decision has been deferred until 2011.

While a maximum journey length of 9 hours will be a considerable
improvement on current legislation, it is still a long time to be
spent in a confined space with no room to turn around, lie down and
without access to water.

See also our factfiles on Poultry, Pigs, Cattle, Fish and Lobsters,
then Go Veggie - it's easier than you think.


Choose life, go veggie - see our special vegetarian pages or send for
a FREE go veggie pack now!

Top ^



www.animalaid.org.uk | site map | about us |

Animal Aid campaigns peacefully against all animal abuse, and
promotes a cruelty-free lifestyle. You can support our work by
joining, making a donation, or using our online shop. Contact Animal
Aid at The Old Chapel, Bradford Street, Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1AW, UK,
tel +44 (0)1732 364546, fax +44 (0)1732 366533, email
***@animalaid.org.uk




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:22:05 UTC
Permalink
THE FISH BUSINESS
As part of our Veggie Month campaign, we take a look at animal welfare
in the farming industry. This article takes a close look at the
suffering of fish. Other articles in this series cover Cattle, Sheep,
Poultry, Pigs and Lobsters.

When hauled up from the deep, fish undergo excruciating decompression.
Frequently, the intense internal pressure ruptures the swimbladder,
pops out the eyes, and pushes the oesophagus and stomach out through
the mouth. Most fish are gutted whilst still alive or are left to
suffocate.

The whole process, totally ungoverned by humane protocols, let alone
laws, is the greatest animal welfare scandal of our times.

Cruel, unhealthy and environmentally damaging
Many people who regard themselves as vegetarians continue to eat fish
in the belief that, unlike land-dwelling animals, fish are incapable
of feeling pain; that fish meat and oils are vital for good health;
and that the catching and preparation of fish is less environmentally
damaging than the farming of pigs, sheep, cattle and poultry.

All these assumptions are wrong. There is sound scientific evidence
pointing to the capacity of fish to feel pain and stress. Fish
products are typically overly rich in protein, saturated fat and
cholesterol - and also come loaded with toxic chemical residues which
'bioconcentrate' in their muscles; the parts generally eaten.
Furthermore, the environmental damage caused by both ocean fishing and
the production of salmon and trout in factory farms is massively
polluting as well as being responsible for denuding the world's oceans
of once plentiful fish species. These practices also endanger many
other sea and land-dwelling species who have hitherto depended for
their existence on the fish plundered by human beings.

FISH DO FEEL PAIN
Increased heart rate, increased breathing rate, adrenaline rush,
writhing, gasping - fish display similar signs to humans when under
stress and faced with dangerous situations. Fish feel pain out of
biological necessity, just as all mammals do. They possess a brain,
central nervous system and pain receptors all over their bodies.
Without the ability to feel pain they would not survive. They also
produce enkephalins and endorphins, chemicals known to counter pain in
humans. Scientific reports from around the world substantiate these
basic realities and, thereby, underscore the cruelty and suffering
inherent in the catching and killing of fish.

The evidence for pain
In a key 1996 report examining the welfare of farmed fish, the
Ministry of Agriculture's official advisory body, the Farm Animal
Welfare Council, noted the following:
'Almost all fish live the whole of their lives in water and show a
maximal emergency response when removed from water, even for a very
short period. This response includes changes in heart rate, increased
production of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol and vigorous
muscle contractions…' These changes 'often indicate fear in the
fish…All of the scientific evidence concerning such effects makes it
clear that the term stress is certainly relevant to fish and that the
means by which stress effects are mediated are very similar to those
in mammals. Evidence that the term pain is applicable to fish comes
from anatomical, physiological and behavioural studies whose results
are very similar to those of studies on birds and mammals. The fact
that fish are cold blooded does not prevent them from having a pain
system and, indeed, such a system is valuable in preserving life and
maximising the biological fitness of individuals. The receptor cells,
neuronal pathways and specialised transmitter substances in the pain
system are very similar in fish to those in mammals.' (Farm Animal
Welfare Council Report on the Welfare of Farmed Fish, September 1996)

'Fish react to stress and other environmental challenges in much the
same way as traditional research animals.' (In T. Brattelid and AJ
Smith, Laboratory Animals (2000) 34, 131-135.)
The Medway Report, an enquiry sponsored by the RSPCA into angling and
shooting (1979), concluded:
'[The] evidence suggests that all vertebrates (including fish)...
experience similar sensations to a greater or lesser degree in
response to noxious stimuli.'

The report stated that there is no reason to differentiate between
warm-blooded and cold-blooded creatures.

Even a study funded by the British Field Sports Society and the
National Federation of Anglers found that capture of fish by anglers
causes acute physiological stress. (T.G. Pottinger, Fish Welfare
Literature Review, The Institute of Freshwater Ecology, May 1995.)
Dr Donald Broom, Professor of Animal Welfare at Cambridge University,
has stated:
'The scientific literature is quite clear. Anatomically,
physiologically and biologically, the pain system in fish is virtually
the same as in birds and mammals...in animal welfare terms, you have
to put fishing in the same category as hunting.' (Daily Telegraph,
October 19, 1995.)

BASIC FACTS ABOUT FISH
Fish are cold-blooded, which means that their blood temperature
fluctuates in relation to the surrounding water. They breathe through
their gills - taking in water through their mouths, retaining the
oxygen and passing it into their bloodstream. Their bodies are covered
with overlapping waterproof scales to provide protection against
infection without hindering movement. Their scales are not watertight,
so fish have a layer of protective mucus, which also keeps out
infection. Handling by humans damages this mucus, leaving the fish
vulnerable to disease when returned to the water.

Most fish have a row of tiny pores on their sides called the lateral
line. These act as a hearing aid, making them very sensitive to
vibrations and reflections. Outside the water, however, they can hear
no sounds. They also have a swim bladder to help them balance and move
from deep to shallow water. Fish are short sighted. Their eyes can
look in separate directions at the same time. They do have colour
vision, though. Hence the use by anglers of brightly coloured bait.

Just as we use our hands, fish use their tongues and lips to build
nests, gather food and hide their young from danger.

EATING FISH - THE UNHEALTHY OPTION
Too much fat and no fibre
Like the flesh of other animals, fish meat is far from a healthy
choice, reports Dr Neal Barnard of the influential Physicians
Committee for Responsible Medicine (www.pcrm.org). It contains
excessive amounts of animal protein (associated with increased loss of
calcium from bones), saturated fat and cholesterol. Fish meat has no
complex carbohydrates and no fibre. Fish, such as sea trout, are
almost one-third fat and salmon meat is more than 50 per cent fat.
Ounce for ounce, shrimp has double the cholesterol of beef. And while
fish and fish oil capsules do contain essential fatty acids, such as
omega 3, they also contain an equal amount of artery-clogging
saturated fats. A good, non-animal source of omega 3 is linseed/flax.

Loaded with toxic chemicals
The flesh of fish comes loaded with toxic chemical residues, which
concentrate in their muscles. This is because fish swim the global
ocean, picking up industrial pollution. Big fish eat little fish and
the bigger the fish (e.g. tuna and salmon) the greater the
bio-accumulation of toxic chemicals throughout their flesh. These
concentrations can be as high as nine million times those found in the
polluted waters in which they swim. Mercury - a liquid metal - is
among the toxic substances that builds up in the flesh of tuna. It can
cause brain damage in human consumers. Pesticides, such as DDT, plus
PCBs (an industrial chemical) and dioxin (a by-product of industrial
incineration) have all been linked to cancers, nervous disorders and
foetal damage.

Women who eat fish, Dr Barnard reports, are more likely to give birth
to sluggish infants with learning difficulties, compared with those
who abstain or who rarely eat fish.

Food poisoning risk
It is estimated that the risk of food poisoning from eating fish is
far greater than that from eating beef, poultry or pork. This is
because fish and the bacteria living on them flourish in the kind of
temperatures found in refrigerators. Trimethylamine is the chemical
that produces the 'fishy' smell we all recognise. What many people
don't realise is that this odour is produced when fish begins to
spoil. Fish oils decompose quickly and in the process unleash free
radicals, which are linked to cell damage in the human body. Free
radicals are believed to be a first important step in heart disease,
cancer and the ageing process.

Worse still for farmed fish
The above relates to ocean-going fish. The health picture with respect
to farmed salmon and trout is direr still, according to a report by
The Observer newspaper (Jan. 7, 2001). The captive fish, the newspaper
noted, are fattened on a diet of pellets made from the rendered
remains of small fish that have a high oil content to promote growth.
These small fish, as we've seen, are already contaminated with
man-made pollutants, such as dioxins and PCBs, which can cause cancer
and learning difficulties in children. By compressing them into
pellets to feed other fish, the contamination is greatly magnified.

COMMERCIAL FISHING
Emptying the world's oceans
The world's wild fish populations are rapidly declining as more and
more vessels chase fewer and fewer fish. Once-common large species,
such as cod and tuna, are disappearing. In 1998 the United Nations
estimated that nearly half the world's fish 'stocks' were fully
exploited and that recovery depended on one in three of the world's
fishing boats stopping fishing. With bigger fish in serious trouble,
smaller species such as mackerel, sardines and anchovies are now the
main targets. These smaller fish are not caught for direct consumption
by humans, rather they are processed into pelleted feed for factory
farmed salmon and trout. It takes around five tons of wild caught fish
to grow one ton of farmed fish - clearly an unsustainable activity.

No hiding place
The boats that are emptying the world's seas are vast floating factory
units, equipped with radar and satellite technology to track their
helpless prey. As a special report in The Guardian newspaper noted:

'Fish have no chance of escape. Entire shoals are surrounded by nets
and sucked in for processing and freezing, leaving nothing left in the
sea to breed and replenish stocks.' (The Guardian August 14, 2000.)

The agony of capture
Vast drift nets, some 40 km long, are also used to trawl the seas.
Fish can be dragged along the ocean bed for hours within these nets,
trapped alongside rocks, debris and other sea life that has fallen in
the net's path. When hauled up from the deep, fish undergo
excruciating decompression. Frequently, the intense internal pressure
ruptures the swimbladder, pops out the eyes, and pushes the oesophagus
and stomach out through the mouth. The catch is sorted using small,
spiked rods called pickers. Factory ships slaughter and process the
fish at sea. Most fish are gutted whilst still alive or are left to
suffocate. The whole process, totally ungoverned by humane protocols,
let alone laws, is the greatest animal welfare scandal of our times.

The decline in fish populations is leading to increasing conflicts
between fisheries and the wildlife who depend on them for their
survival. Huge numbers of 'non target' animals are indiscriminately
killed when caught up in the drift nets. And some fisheries
intentionally kill or maim seals, birds, and marine mammals who they
perceive as a threat to their catch.

Rich versus poor world
Having decimated the oceans in their own geographical zones, the rich
nations are moving in on the fisheries of Africa and South America and
are decimating them. Notes Euan Dunn, fisheries officer of the Royal
Society for the Protection of Birds:

'We are exporting our own mismanagement of Europe's fish stocks to the
developing world. We are moving from stock to stock, systematically
destroying it and moving on to the next.' (The Guardian, Aug. 14,
2000.)

Down and out
Evidence is mounting that once a fish population is seriously reduced
it will never recover. An example are the cod of the Grand Banks off
Newfoundland, 'once the most prolific fishery in the world', The
Guardian article reported. The fishery was closed in 1992 in the
expectation that it would have recovered within three years at most.
The cod have still not returned.

Bottom of the barrel
With the ocean's larger fish in decline and the smaller ones set to
follow, the Norwegians have suggested harvesting the plankton, the
smallest living organism of the ocean, which include the larvae of
many fish and shellfish - this in order to provide pelleted feed for
fish farms.

Said the RSPB's Dunn:

'This is taking fishing down the food chain to its ultimate conclusion
and wiping out all stocks at source, literally emptying the oceans of
life and preventing any recovery.'

INTENSIVE FISH FARMING
Deadly crush
In much the same way that chickens, pigs, cattle and sheep have become
victims of the race to produce more animals at cheaper prices, so too
have salmon and trout. Wild salmon normally migrate over hundreds of
miles, ranging from the rivers where they were spawned to the open
sea. Scottish farmed fish start their lives in industrial hatcheries
and are then moved to huge cages, often located at the mouths of sea
lochs. The cages are up to 70 metres in diameter, with plans to extend
them to 90 metres. Around 250,000 fish are tightly packed into each
cage. Many die prematurely under this intensive regime. There is also
a high level of snout, fin and other injuries - plus infestations and
viral and bacterial infections.

Dosed with drugs and chemicals
In an attempt to limit the disease, the fish are dosed with chemicals,
antibiotics and other drugs. Three medicinal products were licensed
for use in salmon farms in 1989. By 2000 there were 26, with a further
14 under consideration.

The fish are also administered additives in their feed in order to
give their flesh a colouring that will appeal to consumers. The Swiss
pharmaceutical giant, Roche, produces a colour chart from which the
fish farmers can select their preferred hue.

Disease catastrophes
Despite the high drug inputs, disease is rife within the cages.
Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is one serious viral condition that
broke out in Scottish farms in 1998 and led to the culling of millions
of fish. It had previously ravaged farms in Canada and Norway. The
highly infectious condition, for which there is no known cure, causes
the fish to suffer internal bleeding and great stress. There is
evidence that human beings might also be affected by the virus.

Eaten alive
Lice infestation is another devastating, highly stressful condition
that flourishes in the cages. The lice multiply and graze on the
fishes' flesh, literally eating them alive from the outside in. The
industry attempts to control the lice through the use of antibiotics
and toxic pesticides. But it's a losing battle and the lice spread
from the cages to nearby wild fish, who have been found with up to 500
lice on them, instead of a normal and manageable five or six.
Populations of wild salmon in the fish farming centre of the
north-west Scottish highlands have been decimated as a result of these
infestations.

Escapes to the sea
Escapes from the farms also impact upon wild fish populations. Friends
of the Earth calculate that at least 700,000 fish have escaped from
farms in the three years to April 2000. (The Independent April 12,
2000). As well as carrying diseases to the wild fish, some of the
escapees are almost certainly breeding with their wild cousins,
causing, as yet unquantified, genetic problems.

Not satisfied with the damage already done to natural ecosystems, the
fish farming industry has commissioned reckless gene engineering
experiments designed to produce giant, rapid growing specimens. The
result is salmon that can grow six times as fast as normal fish.

Pollution
The intensive feeding regimes to which the caged fish are subject is
one more source of damage to wild fish populations and to the wider
environment. This is because much of what the fish are fed, according
to a major report in The Observer newspaper (Jan. 7, 2001), drops
straight through their cages and gathers on the loch bottom along with
the salmons' ammonium-rich faeces. The World Wide Fund for Nature
calculates that the level of pollution from fish farms on the west
coast of Scotland is comparable to the sewage output of up to 9.4
million people.

Light manipulation
As well as the fatty, pelleted diet, the fishes' growth rate is
accelerated by the use of light manipulation, The Observer reported.

'The hatchery tanks are covered so they are completely dark, then
intense lights are shone in to fool the fish into thinking they are
going through their natural growing seasons.'

A brutal killing
Prior to slaughter, the fish are starved for days and even weeks. In
some units they are killed by first being hit on the head with a club
and then having their gill arches torn or cut so that they bleed to
death. In other operations, the fish are placed in a tank with carbon
monoxide and then clubbed or bled to death.

See also our factfiles on Sheep, Poultry, Pigs, Cattle and Lobsters.

Go veggie - it's easier than you think.

Top ^



www.animalaid.org.uk | site map | about us |

Animal Aid campaigns peacefully against all animal abuse, and
promotes a cruelty-free lifestyle. You can support our work by
joining, making a donation, or using our online shop. Contact Animal
Aid at The Old Chapel, Bradford Street, Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1AW, UK,
tel +44 (0)1732 364546, fax +44 (0)1732 366533, email
***@animalaid.org.uk




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 11:22:49 UTC
Permalink
CLOSE UP

Becky Smith examines the barbaric treatment of lobsters.

Wild lobsters can live to be a hundred years old. They carry their
young for nine months. With highly developed systems of both smell and
taste they use complicated signals to determine any changes in their
home environment.

Lobsters 'smell' chemicals in the water with their antennae and
'taste' with sensory hairs along their legs. They can produce and
detect low-frequency sounds.

Although they do not have a cerebral cortex (the area of the brain
identified as translating pain impulses into the sensation of pain),
lobsters are described by those who have studied them as having
complex nervous systems. Invertebrate zoologist Jaren Horsley has
studied crustaceans for years and states that the lobster, 'has a
sophisticated nervous system that, among other things, allows it to
sense actions that will cause it harm... [Lobsters] can, I am sure,
sense pain'.

From sea to the dinner table
Lobsters are caught in traps. If the trap has not been fitted with a
timed release mechanism and if not retrieved, they will die from
hunger, cannibalism or through being washed up on a beach. During
transportation, they are typically packed tightly together in tanks
with their claws bound with elastic bands to prevent them from
injuring each other.

Restaurants normally prepare lobsters by placing them alive into
boiling water. The Shellfish Network state that when immersed,
lobsters 'behave wildly, whipping their tails and trying to escape'.
It is a myth that they gradually fall unconscious if the water is
slowly brought to the boil. Lobsters will shake, tremble, struggle and
flip violently as the temperature is increased. Death can take
anything from 15 seconds to 7 minutes.

Lobsters who have become inactive due to prolonged periods of
transportation or confinement may not react so obviously as those
taken straight from the sea to the pot, but they are still almost
certainly sensitive to pain.

'Humane' alternatives
Even so-called humane alternatives to boiling alive are barbaric. The
Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) states that lobsters
can be killed by using a sharp knife to split the creature from head
to tail down the mid-line, cutting through the chain of nerve centres
which run down the length of the body. They warn, however, that, 'this
needs practice'. Furthermore, its research did not examine thoroughly
the neurological responses that might have been present and indicative
of pain and stress after slicing. Animals could well have been
conscious throughout the process.

Sometimes lobsters are frozen before being killed. In a paper
entitled, Lobster Biology, Physiology, Neurobiology, The Lobster
Conservancy points out that freezing will expose lobsters to an
unpleasant, unnatural temperature and that death/loss of consciousness
will not be immediate. The Shellfish Network warns that 'the freezing
compartment of a refrigerator would not be cold enough' and that
lobsters may regain consciousness if they are not boiled immediately
after removal from the freezer.

An electric stunning tank has been developed which allows lobsters to
be electrically stunned before they are cooked, but there is little
evidence that they experience anything more than a short-term effect
from this type of stunning. Their hearts often regain normal beats.

For more information see The silent suffering of lobsters.

Top ^



www.animalaid.org.uk | site map | about us |

Animal Aid campaigns peacefully against all animal abuse, and
promotes a cruelty-free lifestyle. You can support our work by
joining, making a donation, or using our online shop. Contact Animal
Aid at The Old Chapel, Bradford Street, Tonbridge, Kent, TN9 1AW, UK,
tel +44 (0)1732 364546, fax +44 (0)1732 366533, email
***@animalaid.org.uk




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Ice
2006-07-19 10:20:05 UTC
Permalink
By 31 December 2012 farmers must have phased out the use of battery
cages in favour of 'free-range' farming. 'Enriched cages' will have to
give at least 750 sq cm of space per chicken - twice the size of
current cages, but still less than the size of two sheets of A4 paper.


"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
We Are Devo!
2006-07-19 15:09:37 UTC
Permalink
By combining electro-pop, ?70s cop sitcom theme music, Bollywood
soundtracks, cheerleading chants, hip hop and noise guitar, The Go!
Team are the new Prozac. We have no intention of missing our fix, and
we?re not alone ? NME called The Go! Team ?one of the greatest bands
in the world today?.
Away and through shite at the moon, PMSL, The Go Team , "one of the
greatest bands ever", WTF does the NME know, it's serves your spamming
needs more like it, you copy n paste muppet!
--
"The computer can't tell you the emotional story.
It can give you the exact mathematical design,
but what's missing is the eyebrows."
- Frank Zappa
PUSHERBOT
2006-07-19 17:47:45 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 19 Jul 2006 16:09:37 +0100, We Are Devo!
Post by We Are Devo!
By combining electro-pop, ?70s cop sitcom theme music, Bollywood
soundtracks, cheerleading chants, hip hop and noise guitar, The Go!
Team are the new Prozac. We have no intention of missing our fix, and
we?re not alone ? NME called The Go! Team ?one of the greatest bands
in the world today?.
Away and through shite at the moon, PMSL, The Go Team , "one of the
greatest bands ever", WTF does the NME know, it's serves your spamming
needs more like it, you copy n paste muppet!
Re: Go Team


Shame that black lass can't sing to save her life...bless her.
We Are Devo!
2006-07-19 18:08:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by PUSHERBOT
Re: Go Team
Shame that black lass can't sing to save her life...bless her.
Bless.

Sorry to keep it OT (and ain't my spelling bad), but, have you heard
the drummers? Two of them and neither could hit a bull on the ass with
a banjo!

I have not seen them re-booked for the 06 festivals, pheww :)

Over and Out.
--
"The computer can't tell you the emotional story.
It can give you the exact mathematical design,
but what's missing is the eyebrows."
- Frank Zappa
PUSHERBOT
2006-07-21 17:10:24 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 19 Jul 2006 19:08:52 +0100, We Are Devo!
Post by We Are Devo!
Post by PUSHERBOT
Re: Go Team
Shame that black lass can't sing to save her life...bless her.
Bless.
Sorry to keep it OT (and ain't my spelling bad), but, have you heard
the drummers? Two of them and neither could hit a bull on the ass with
a banjo!
I have not seen them re-booked for the 06 festivals, pheww :)
Over and Out.
Yeah I forgot about them. Go Team! are a band so obviously the
brainchild of some nice boring middle-class white men (nowt that
there's wrong with that - I'm one myself!) who sooo want to be hip.

Hey how can we be cool?

Two drummers just like Gary Glitter. Check!
Groovy japanese guitarist who's, like, into Sonic Youth and
stuff.Check!
Cool black girl who can dance, and sing. Two out of three aint bad!
3 anonymous white guys looking like they've come straight from a
geography teacher convention on bass & guitar, Triple check!

We Are Devo!
2006-07-19 15:10:56 UTC
Permalink
By combining electro-pop, ?70s cop sitcom theme music, Bollywood
soundtracks, cheerleading chants, hip hop and noise guitar, The Go!
Team are the new Prozac. We have no intention of missing our fix, and
we?re not alone ? NME called The Go! Team ?one of the greatest bands
in the world today?.
Away and throw shite at the moon, PMSL, The Go Team , "one of the
greatest bands ever", WTF does the NME know, it's serves your spamming
needs more like it, you copy n paste muppet!
--
"The computer can't tell you the emotional story.
It can give you the exact mathematical design,
but what's missing is the eyebrows."
- Frank Zappa
Derek
2006-07-19 15:48:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ice
NME called The Go! Team “one of the greatest bands
in the world today”.
Rubbish! Download 'System of a Down' and listen to the
tracks

Chop Suey
Toxicity
Psycho
Aerials
B.Y.O.B

for example, or download their video 'Big Day Out on The Gold Coast (Australia)'
Ice
2006-07-18 09:27:13 UTC
Permalink
Pig Farmer Charged with Cruelty
http://www.hillside.org.uk/investigations/investigations-pigs.htm

We took this picture on a Norfolk farm where pigs were kept in the
most harrowing state. Living in up to TWO FOOT OF EXCREMENT, some of
the animals were emaciated and displaying desperate cannibalistic
behaviour. We saw pregnant sows and witnessed one giving birth only
for the piglets to be immediately devoured by the rest.

We immediately reported our horrific findings, some of the worse we
have ever witnessed, to Trading Standards who inspected the farm the
following day. This resulted in the farmer being charged with causing
unnecessary suffering to animals.

Unfortunately, despite the appalling suffering he had caused to his
pigs, the case against Frederick Waller, of Hevingham, Norfolk, was
dismissed. Although he was made to sign an undertaking not to keep
pigs and other animals until 'further order', we have discovered that
pigs are still being kept on his premises.




"As I was walkin' - I saw a sign there
And that sign said - no tress passin'
But on the other side .... it didn't say nothin!
Now that side was made for you and me!"
Woody Guthrie

A prophet is only despised in his own country....
.........among his own relations...
...........and in his own house
Jill
2006-07-18 08:27:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat Gardiner
Actually, it all comes down to much the same thing. If we can persuade Jim
to write about all irregular and illegal activities by Defra and
associates, whether they impact on industrial scale farming or not,
I think you will find he already has -- many times, and much more coherently
than you will ever aspire to
--
regards
Jill Bowis

Pure bred utility chickens and ducks
Housing; Equipment, Books, Videos, Gifts
Herbaceous; Herb and Alpine nursery
Working Holidays in Scotland
http://www.kintaline.co.uk
David G. Bell
2006-07-18 08:57:00 UTC
Permalink
On Tuesday, in article
Post by Jill
Post by Pat Gardiner
Actually, it all comes down to much the same thing. If we can persuade Jim
to write about all irregular and illegal activities by Defra and
associates, whether they impact on industrial scale farming or not,
I think you will find he already has -- many times, and much more coherently
than you will ever aspire to
And Jim even gets paid for it. I've met some of the editors who publish
his stuff, and they're pretty smart people.
--
David G. Bell -- SF Fan, Filker, and Punslinger.

"I am Number Two," said Penfold. "You are Number Six."
Jim Webster
2006-07-18 14:38:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by David G. Bell
On Tuesday, in article
Post by Jill
Post by Pat Gardiner
Actually, it all comes down to much the same thing. If we can persuade Jim
to write about all irregular and illegal activities by Defra and
associates, whether they impact on industrial scale farming or not,
I think you will find he already has -- many times, and much more coherently
than you will ever aspire to
And Jim even gets paid for it. I've met some of the editors who publish
his stuff, and they're pretty smart people.
the problem is that pat hasn't the knowledge to actually understand what is
going on,
--
--

Jim Webster.

Pat Gardiner, now in the sixth year of raving about bent vets and still no
result
Pat Gardiner
2006-07-18 15:14:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jill
Post by David G. Bell
On Tuesday, in article
Post by Jill
Post by Pat Gardiner
Actually, it all comes down to much the same thing. If we can
persuade
Jim
Post by David G. Bell
Post by Jill
Post by Pat Gardiner
to write about all irregular and illegal activities by Defra and
associates, whether they impact on industrial scale farming or not,
I think you will find he already has -- many times, and much more
coherently
Post by David G. Bell
Post by Jill
than you will ever aspire to
And Jim even gets paid for it. I've met some of the editors who publish
his stuff, and they're pretty smart people.
the problem is that pat hasn't the knowledge to actually understand what is
going on,
I freely admit that I could not understand Jim's economic therories. They
seemed to owe nothing to any known school of study of the subject and seemed
to be totally original.

I had the suspicion that most of the editors could not understand them
either - and being journalists probably ascribed this to his being cleverer
and soberer than them. They must have thought they were taking their
journals in an upmarket direction - and it did fill an awful lot of space. I
expect they negotiated on the basis of job lot and raised their advertising
rates accordingly.

However, he is getting more comprehensible, as I said, and I actually look
forward to his article on brucellosis and contagious agalactia testing. If
he needs sight of the substantiating documents, this can be arranged.

You can't let "Pete" and friends make all the running.
--
Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com
Post by Jill
--
--
Jim Webster.
Pat Gardiner, now in the sixth year of raving about bent vets and still no
result
p***@btinternet.com
2006-07-18 15:03:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jill
Post by Pat Gardiner
Actually, it all comes down to much the same thing. If we can persuade Jim
to write about all irregular and illegal activities by Defra and
associates, whether they impact on industrial scale farming or not,
I think you will find he already has -- many times, and much more coherently
than you will ever aspire to
Then I'm sure we can expect this doughty champion of human rights and
integrity in international affairs to pen an appropriate article
condemning the duplicity of Defra in respect of brucellosis and
contagious agalactia testing.

It would be pretty influential stuff coming from the Cumbria president
of the Country Land an Business Association.

Live exports of sheep from the UK would be halted, Jim would probably
be given the Chevalier dans l'Ordre National de la Légion
d'Honneur in recognition of his contribution to keeping animal
disease out of France. He always was a fan of the negotiating tactics
of French farmers.

Can you tell me, when he publishs? My nerves are not strong enough for
a regular read of Farmers' Guardian.

Thanks.

Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com.
Post by Jill
--
regards
Jill Bowis
Pure bred utility chickens and ducks
Housing; Equipment, Books, Videos, Gifts
Herbaceous; Herb and Alpine nursery
Working Holidays in Scotland
http://www.kintaline.co.uk
Jill
2006-07-18 15:10:03 UTC
Permalink
Can you tell me, when he publishs? My nerves are not strong enough for a
regular read of Farmers' Guardian.
Shame - you would learn something
--
regards
Jill Bowis
www.benderloch.org.uk/forum - history, geology, ecology, genealogy, weather,
webcam, local forum
www.kintaline.co.uk - where we are, what we do: Kintaline Plant and Poultry
Centre
Jim Webster
2006-07-18 16:21:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jill
Can you tell me, when he publishs? My nerves are not strong enough for a
regular read of Farmers' Guardian.
Shame - you would learn something
I think we have conclusively proved over the last six years that pat cannot
learn anything new

--
--

Jim Webster.

Pat Gardiner, now in the sixth year of raving about bent vets and still no
result
Oz
2006-07-18 16:31:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Webster
I think we have conclusively proved over the last six years that pat cannot
learn anything new
Probably hasn't learned to tie his shoelaces yet.
--
Oz
This post is worth absolutely nothing and is probably fallacious.
Pat Gardiner
2006-07-18 18:29:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oz
Post by Jim Webster
I think we have conclusively proved over the last six years that pat cannot
learn anything new
Probably hasn't learned to tie his shoelaces yet.
Well, that confirms it!

The politburo are in a total state of panic. Rightly so.

Anyone who deliberately gives someone advice designed to cost them thousands
of pounds and wreck a newly planted orchard has a number of screws loose. A
thoroughly nasty, unpleasant and evil man.

You are right Oz, Jim has dropped you right in it.

Get some medical attention, before your shoelaces are confiscated.

I would shut up and stay shut up.

Let your mate explain Britain's callous and reckless disregard of EU
biosecurity rules in respect of live sheep exports.

He is better at excusing crooks than you are
--
Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com
--
Regards
Pat Gardiner
www.go-self-sufficient.com
Post by Oz
--
Oz
This post is worth absolutely nothing and is probably fallacious.
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